Tag Archives: Summer

Fairy Falls (Summer)

Directions: Take I-84 East to exit 28. Go left on the Historic Highway to the Wahkeena Falls Trailhead.

Whenever we do this hike we’re always reminded just how pretty it is and thoroughly enjoy ourselves.

From the trailhead cross the small bridge over the creek and head up a long paved switchback that takes you to Wahkeena Falls. Even during the summer months this waterfall puts off a decent amount of spray so you may get a bit wet as you cross in front of it. The trail stays paved as you pass a bench and head for the cardio kicker section of this hike- 12 switchbacks. The switchbacks are fairly short and are paved for the most part.

      

      

Once you make it to the end of the switchbacks you will come to a trail junction. It’s worth the short trip to Lemmon’s Viewpoint off to the right. Once you’ve seen enough at the viewpoint head back to the junction and go left where you will start seeing the creek and the trail levels out briefly. The pavement also ends here and switches to dirt and rock. You will be following the creek just about the rest of the hike as you cross the first of two footbridges and the trail again starts heading uphill. All through this area is very beautiful with all the moss covered trees and the creek being so close to the trail. It’s one of our favorite sections of Gorge trails. After crossing the second footbridge you have a few more switchbacks and then you are at Fairy Falls. The waterfall is right on the trail and there is a bench to rest or enjoy lunch.

      

When you’re ready, head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: 2.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 800 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: There’s a good amount of elevation for the short distance so this hike may not be best for younger kids and older folks.

Bathrooms: Yes but they are seasonal

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes especially nice weekends

Warnings: None

Cape Kiwanda (Summer)

Directions: Head to Pacific City on the Oregon Coast and get onto Cape Kiwanda Drive. Follow it down to the public parking areas near the beach.

From the parking area head down towards the beach. Take a right and head for the large dune right in front of you. Go left on the dune where it’s less steep and hike up to the top. Once up at the top you will have great views of the beach below, Pacific City, and the Haystack out in the ocean. There is an interesting cave that makes quite the noise when large waves come crashing in. You can go farther up the dune to get even better views as well. There is a lot to explore up here so make sure you give yourself enough time to see everything!

      

      

There is a cable fence that runs along the top and while we were here there was a Ranger walking along the fence letting people know that it is allowed to cross the fence, but he was warning that it’s very dangerous near the edges. He flat out didn’t recommend going down towards the cave. Many people have fallen at Cape Kiwanda and there are a lot of clothespins clipped to the fence with memorials written on them for those who have died. The day before an 8 foot chunk had fallen into the ocean, the edges are very unstable. 

      

We did cross the fence at the large flat area, but didn’t go anywhere near the sides. We saw a lot of people standing right on the sides and down by the cave. We do NOT recommend doing this. Please listen to the Ranger and stay where it’s safe.

We saw plenty of seabirds, and a deer munching on some bushes on a ledge. Whales have been spotted during the summer months but we didn’t see any on our trip. We were surprised to see paintbrush, clover, and salal blooming, it was a nice treat!

      

Cape Kiwanda is a VERY popular place and definitely shows some signs of over loving. Please respect the area and pack out anything you brought with you.

 

Distance: .5 – 2 miles, depends how much exploring you do (easy)

Elevation: 240 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes year round

Warnings: Falling

University Falls (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 West and then get on Highway 6 (for Banks and Tillamook). After about 19 miles on Highway 6 take a left at the road for Rogers Camp. Go right at the split so you’re on Saddle Mountain Road. Follow the road (staying right at all the splits) for about 3 miles, the road is always signed for University Falls. The trailhead is on the right side of the road and well marked. It’s a gravel road with a few potholes but it’s pretty well maintained. Watch for logging trucks and ATV’s

Last time we were here we happened to pick a day with a huge trail run going through the area. This time was much better since we didn’t have to dodge people running up on us out of nowhere 😆

From the small parking area get on the trail that starts out heading uphill gradually. You will soon come to a ATV crossing, after this crossing the trail starts heading downhill. There were a lot more flowers this time, the salal was blooming all along the trail as well as some wild daisies and tiny lupine.

      

After passing the large clearcut area off to your right the trail levels out again and curves left. The sign for the waterfall was knocked down this time but the trail off to the left is overgrown but still obvious. Along this side trail was some muddy areas that were a haven for mosquitoes but quick to pass through. You’ll quickly see the creek and then University Falls off in the distance.

      Head back out the way you came in.

The trail was a little better this time around with the flowers but the clearcut is still ugly. It takes away from what could be a very pretty coast range hike.

 

Distance: .8 mile (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Season: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Clackamas County Lavender Festival

Directions: The Oregon Lavender Farm is located at 20949 S. Harris Rd. Oregon City, OR 97045

We have wanted to check out a lavender festival for a while now and decided on the Clackamas County one. It only goes for one weekend but it’s well worth the visit.

The fields were full and very pretty, you even get an amazing view of Mt. Hood from one field. There is a u-cut section for people wanting to take some lavender home and a tent where you can make a lavender wreath.

      

There is a good sized area with craft vendors and they had a wide variety of stuff for sale. Multiple food and alcohol vendors as well, make sure to try the lavender lemonade! They have a good amount of seating to enjoy your food and drinks while listening to one of the live musicians they have playing. There is also a water feature that a lot of kids were having fun in.

      

We’ll definitely be back next year!

For more information check out thee farms website here.

Best Of 2016

We did a lot of great hikes in 2016, here are some of our favorites and our overall top hike of the year.

  • Willamette Valley:

Henline Falls– This is a short hike but it takes you to an amazing waterfall. Catch it at the right time of day and you might just see a rainbow at the base as well!

  • Columbia River Gorge:

Columbia Hills State Park– Great area to see wildflowers with amazing views of the Gorge.

  • Washington:

Lewis River Falls– So many pretty waterfalls in such a short distance. Definitely a must see.

  • Coast:

The Thumb– This was probably the most unique hike we did this year.

  • Central Oregon:

Smith Rock (Misery Ridge)– The views are amazing at the top and you get a very up close view of Monkey Face!

  • Mt. Hood:

Wind Lake– You get to ride a chairlift up to the top of Ski Bowl and then hike to a somewhat hidden lake. And the whole time you have great views of Mt. Hood and Government Camp. 

  • Portland:

Powell Butte- This is a great hike in the city. On a clear day you can see Mt. Hood, Mt. St Helens, and Mt. Hood.

  • Southern Oregon:

Plaikni Falls– This hike was inside Crater Lake National Park, it’s very pretty, especially in autumn with all the beautiful colors.

  • Kayak:

Disappearing Lake– This was such a treat! It’s a lake that’s only around for about a month out of the whole year.

Overall Best of 2016:

Bald Mountain– The hike up bald mountain is beautiful and lined with beargrass. Once at the top you round a corner and come to one of the best views of Mt. Hood we’ve ever seen. Do this hike!

What were some of your favorite hikes in 2016? Any you’re looking forward to doing in 2017?

 

Ape Caves (Summer)

Directions: Take I-5 North to exit 21 (Woodland/Highway 503) and follow Highway 503 East through the town of Cougar. Highway 503 turns into FR-90, continue on FR-90 and take a left onto Road 83 (signed for Ape Caves and Lava Canyon). Follow the signs to Ape Caves.

The Ape Cave is a large lava tube that was formed about 2,000 years ago from a lava flow on Mt. St. Helens. It is the third longest in North America. The lava tube temperature is 42 degrees year round (bring those jackets, even in the summer heat). It’s recommended that each person has two light sources. You can rent lanterns for $5 at the Ape Headquarters but it is not open year round, call ahead.

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From the parking area follow the short trail that takes you to the opening of the tube. There are lots of interpretive signs and usually a forest service employee in this area. Head down the steps and immediately feel the temperature drop, most people stop here and layer up! Head into the tube and come to two sets of stairs, follow signs for the lower cave.

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From here you are just walking through the tube, you may get dripped on a few times as well. You will pass the “meatball” which is a blob that hardened in a narrow space. The tube is .75 miles one way and narrows the farther you go. The ground is very uneven so watch your step! The very end of the tube is only accessible if you are comfortable crawling. Once you reach where you feel like stopping turn around and head back out the way you came.

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Distance: 1.5 miles

Elevation: 150 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Dogs are not allowed in the Ape Caves.

Good For: All ages- just make sure you are sure footed and ok with low light situations. We did see some young children crying, most likely because it’s so dark.

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Open all year but call ahead late fall through spring.

Popular: Very

Overall: Fun experience, can get extremely busy during summer weekends.

Trail Of Two Forests (Summer)

Directions: Directions: Take I-5 North to exit 21 (Woodland/Highway 503) and follow Highway 503 East through the town of Cougar. Highway 503 turns into FR-90, continue on FR-90 and take a left onto Road 83 (signed for Ape Caves and Lava Canyon). Follow signs for Ape Caves, the parking area for Trail Of Two Forests is just before the caves.

This is a short interpretive trail that is a great addition to any of the hikes in the area.

From the parking area get on the boardwalk trail and follow it to a split in the trail. Go right and head past some interpretive signs about the area. You will soon come to a fun part in the trail, the tree casts. This is where lava flowed through the area and made molds of the trees. There are quite a few of the casts along the trail. You can take a ladder down into one of the horizontal casts and crawl through them.

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Keep following the boardwalk around the loop and it takes you back to your car.

Distance: .3 mile

Elevation: 30 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Vault toilet at the trailhead.

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Late spring through fall. There are snow gates, call before hiking.

Popular: Yes

Overall: Very informative little walk, great place for kids.

June Lake (Summer)

Directions: Directions: Take I-5 North to exit 21 (Woodland/Highway 503) and follow Highway 503 East through the town of Cougar. Highway 503 turns into FR-90, continue on FR-90 and take a left onto Road 83 (signed for Ape Caves and Lava Canyon). Follow Road 83 for about 7 Miles where you will reach the June Lake Trailhead.

From the trailhead follow the trail as it gradually heads uphill. The trail itself is fairly wide and well maintained. You will be following along a creek for part of the hike. There are some small side trails off to your left that offer nice views of Mt. St. Helens on a clear day. Continue to follow the trail uphill, it does get moderately steep the closer you get to the lake.

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After crossing over a small bridge the trail soon opens up into a campsite area. Walk through this area and there is a small trail heading to your right that drops you out at June Lake. This lake is fed by June Lake Falls which you can see on the far side of the lake. Off to your left you can see a large tree that has fallen off the cliff and is upside down, roots sticking up in the air. This is an out and back hike, so head back out the way you came.

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Distance: 2.8 miles

Elevation: 500 feet

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All Ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Late spring through fall. There are snow gates, call ahead before hiking.

Popular: Yes during summer weekends.

Overall: This was a fun little hike, we’ve never seen a lake that was fed by a waterfall.

Lava Canyon Loop (Summer)

Directions: Take I-5 North to exit 21 (Woodland/Highway 503) and follow Highway 503 East through the town of Cougar. Highway 503 turns into FR-90, continue on FR-90 and take a left onto Road 83 (signed for Ape Caves and Lava Canyon). Follow Road 83 for about 12 miles where you will reach the Lava Canyon Trailhead.

From the trailhead follow the paved path down a few switchbacks and to a viewing platform. There isn’t much of a view here but keep going on the trail to a junction. Go left here and the trail soon turns to dirt. A small part of the trail here can be dangerous so watch children and pets. Continue on the trail until you come to the large suspension bridge.

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The bridge is quite narrow and has a good bounce to it. If you are not comfortable with heights it may not be a good idea for you to cross. You will be crossing over Lava Canyon and the Muddy River, you get great views the whole way! After crossing the bridge go right and follow  the trail uphill, sometimes steeply. There are a couple areas with good views of the river and canyon. You will soon come to a set of stairs/metal ladder which heads up steeply.

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From here it’s a short walk to the second bridge. It’s much lower and wider, with no bounce. You will be crossing over a very pretty part of the Muddy River and will also have great views from all directions. Head down the steps after crossing the bridge and back up to the junction. Go left here to hike back up the switchbacks to your car.

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There are MANY warning signs along this trail, and for good reason. There have been many injuries and even a few deaths along this trail. We strongly encourage everyone to stay on the designated trails at all times!

Distance: 1.3 miles

Elevation: 500 feet

Difficulty: Easy to Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes but there are many dangerous spots on this trail for dogs.

Good For: May not be a good idea for young kids and older folks. Also people with height issues will have a struggle with the suspension bridge.

Bathrooms: There is a vault toilet at the trailhead. It was very dirty while we were here.

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Late spring through fall. Call ahead, there are snow gates.

Popular: Yes

Overall: This is a great scenic hike. The suspension bridge is fun as well!

The Thumb (Summer)

Directions: Depending on where you’re coming from head to Lincoln City. Once in Lincoln City go to the very North end of town and turn onto Logan Road. Pass the Safeway and follow the road to the very end. The road ends at two gates, turn around and park in the small gravel turnout.

From the gravel turnout head up the road until you come to the two gates. Head towards the left gate, you can get past the gate on its right side. Follow the trail uphill and you will soon come to a split in the trail. There is a small hiking sign pointing you to the right. From here the trail heads uphill pretty steeply.

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Once at the top of this first steep section the trail splits again. To your left is a washed out trail so stay right and keep heading uphill. Stay on the main trail as you keep going uphill, there will be a couple side trails but don’t take them. Eventually the trail starts to level out as you head into an area that’s thick with salal. It’s pretty overgrown in places and the trail gets really narrow because of it. You will pass a good viewpoint of the ocean as you continue on.

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The trail then starts heading downhill as you come out to the grassy field and get your first good look at The Thumb! Follow the trail through the grass as you reach the base of The Thumb. From here it gets a little hard, the trail heads up very steeply. It’s a short distance but it’s so steep it’s hard to stand up straight. Once at the top you have amazing views of the ocean and Lincoln City below. There isn’t much room at the top so if there are people up there you may want to wait until they come down before you start up. This is an out and back trail so when you are done head back out the way you came in.

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During the wet months this whole trail is very muddy and slick. We have had a stretch of really hot weather and there was still muddy parts in the wooded areas. There are a lot of runoff and washed out areas in the trail as well. So the weather may be something to consider before hiking this trail.

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View of The Thumb from down on Roads End beach.

Distance: 2.5 miles

Elevation: Not 100% sure on the elevation but it’s pretty steep in multiple places.

Difficulty: Moderate to The Thumb, hard going up The Thumb.

Pet Friendly: Yes but there are drop offs that could be dangerous for dogs.

Good For: Sure footed hikers. May not be best for younger kids and older folks.

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All but best in summer.

Popular: No

Overall: This was a great hike, definitely something different which was nice!