Tag Archives: Spring

Tamanawas Falls (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take Highway 26 past Government Camp to the junction with Highway 35. Follow 35 for about 15 miles. The trailhead is just past Sherwood Campground on the left shoulder of the highway.

From the parking area get on the trail and immediately come to a bridge crossing the Hood River. After crossing the bridge go right and follow the trail as it heads uphill for a while. You will come to a point where you can see the highway below, from here the trail heads downhill to another bridge.

     

     

The trail now follows along the creek- there are a few side trails along the way that take you to small waterfalls. Continuing on you will come to a large rock slide area. Please make sure you are following the actual trail and not cutting through, cutting the trail only makes things unstable and unsafe. After you are through the rock slide area it’s just a short distance to the waterfall. Head back out the way you came in.

     

     

Distance: 4 miles (easy)

Elevation: 600 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: NW Forest Pass required

Seasons: May-November

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

Mosier Plateau (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69 (Mosier). Follow the old highway into Mosier and parking in the gravel parking lot just past the totem pole on the left side of the road.

From the parking area cross the bridge and find the trail on the right side of the road near a bench. The trail starts uphill and takes you to an old pioneer cemetery. Continue on the trail where it stays mostly evenly graded and you will come to Mosier Creek Falls down in the canyon off to the right.

   

   

Continuing on you will go up a number of fairly long switchbacks and a few sets of steps. Along the switchbacks we saw bachelors button, poppy’s, balsamroot, and wild cucumber.

   

   

Once you get to the top you will have a great view of the Gorge and it’s covered in balsamroot and lupine. Head back out the way you came in.

   

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 600 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: There is an outhouse by the totem pole

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes during spring wildflower season

Warnings: Ticks, poison oak, and snakes

Camassia Natural Area (Spring 2019)

Directions: Drive south from Portland on I-205 to the West Linn Exit # 8 and turn left at the end of the exit ramp. After going under the highway, turn uphill onto Willamette Falls Drive just before the gas station.  (This is the last right turn before coming to the bridge over the Willamette River, so if you find yourself on the bridge, you went too far).  After one block, Willamette Falls Road turns 90 degrees to the left; continue on Willamette Falls Road for .25 mile. Veer right onto Sunset Avenue, which continues uphill, passing over I-205. Take the first right onto Walnut Street, which ends at the preserve entrance and parking area.

It was hard to believe that we hadn’t visited this beautiful area before- it’s amazing!

From the small parking area get on the trail and quickly come to a board with brochures, in it is a map with a self-guided loop. It’s an easy loop that’s very well marked so we will just hit the highlights in this post.

   

The trail is a mix of boardwalk and wood chips which makes for a nice quiet walk. The boardwalk sections take you through marshy/boggy areas that are very green in the spring. There are a few rocky meadow sections that are covered in camas and rosy plectritis, it’s so pretty but very delicate so please stay on the trail and don’t pick any of the flowers.

   

It’s a great place to bird watch as well. We saw a number of birds and there is a large Osprey nest on a cell tower.

   

Later April through early May is the best time to visit if you are hoping to see the flowers but this would be a great place to visit year round.

   

Distance: 1.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 150 feet (easy

Pet Friendly: No. Dogs are not allowed in this area.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes during peak bloom time

Warnings: None

Memaloose Hills (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69. Follow Highway 30 east and in 3 miles you will see the Memaloose Overlook sign with a gravel parking lot on the left.

This spring has been amazing for Gorge wildflowers the blooms are the best we’ve probably ever seen!

From the parking area carefully cross the road and pick up the trail. It heads gradually uphill passing by a few homes off to the right. You will start seeing wildflowers immediately but it gets better as you go. The trail eventually levels out for a while as you wind your way back towards the hills.

   

Soon you will head down a short hill and come to a small stream that’s easy to cross. Just a short distance later the trail forks, going left/straight takes you to Marsh Hill. This hill is the less steep of the two, you get a nice view of Mt. Hood and it’s covered in wildflowers. When you are done head back down to the split in the trail. Heading off the other way takes you to Chatfield Hill. You will walk through a grassy area filled with buttercups and a bunch of cows off to the left. Soon you will start to head uphill through oak trees and just a short distance later you will come out of the trees and see Chatfild Hill. It was COVERED in balsamroot and lupine when we were here- it was amazing.

   

   

Continue following the trail as it heads up Chatfiled Hill- it does get pretty steep in areas. Once at the top of the hill you will have great views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams and the Columbia River. It’s the best out of the two hills but they are both beautiful. Head back out the way you came in.

   

Some of the many flowers you will see are balsamroot, lupine, paintbrush, buttercups, wild cucumber, and chocolate lilies.

   

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 550 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most- there are some steep sections heading up each hill.

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: During spring wildflower bloom

Warnings: Ticks, poison oak and snakes

Baskett Slough Wildlife Refuge- Morgan Lake (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-5 south to exit 260A. Take Salem Parkway for about 5 miles and take a right onto Marion Street. Cross over the Willamette River and drive for a little over 9 miles on Highway 22, take exit 16 and soon stay left for McMinnville. Take a left at the junction for 99W and drive for 3 miles to Smithfield Road. Continue on this gravel road for about 2.5 miles to a parking area on the left.

Head out on the gravel path that quickly takes a left and goes up a small hill. At the top of this hill you will get a good view of Morgan Lake and the two hills that make up Baskett Butte. Keep going on the gravel trail that dips down and back up to a grassy field. The trail is pretty much nonexistent here so just follow along near the lake.

   

   

Eventually you will see the trail again when you get towards the end of the lake. Continue on a bit farther until you reach a trail junction, this is the end of this hike so head back out the way you came in. This junction has tie trails that lead to other parts of the refuge if you want to extend your hike.

   

The lake was pretty empty, we did see a few mallards and shovelers but that was it. The fields had a ton of geese and there were plenty of birds in the trees and bushes. Definitely bring your binoculars!

   

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 45 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No. Dogs are not allowed in the refuge.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: Morgan Lake is open April 1-September 30

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Government Cove Peninsula (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 East to the exit just past Cascade Locks that’s marked for a weigh station. Get on Frontage Rd and continue on and cross the tracks. Park near the gate.

This is a nice quick hike with good views of the Gorge.

You can pretty much explore this area however you want. There is a paved path that takes you up to the top of the rock. You get nice views at the top and it would make a good place to eat lunch if you brought it.

   

There is also a trail that goes all the way around the base of the rock and takes you out to a point right along the Columbia.

   

We were here a bit too early for wildflowers but if you come late April through early June there will be a bunch of different types of flowers.

Distance: 2.25 miles (easy)

Elevation: 100 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Tulip Festival (2019)

The Tulip Festival is located in Woodburn, Oregon and runs through April 29th this year.

We visited the fields just last Sunday and they were definitely in full bloom so now is a great time to go. We would recommend getting there right when it opens because it gets very busy very quickly. It’s also very muddy right now so rubber boots are a good idea.

   

   

The color was amazing and all of the flowers were beautiful as usual!

   

Check out their website for info on ticket prices, food/craft booths and everything else happening at the farm.

Deschutes River Trail (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 east to exit 97 and take a right, and then a left to get on Highway 206E. From here you will see signs for Deschutes River Park, it’s less than a mile away. Go all the way through the park to the very end where you will see the trailhead.

Walk through the grassy field where you will have two options, going left will take you to the top and middle trail (the top trail is for hikers and bikers, middle just hikers) and going right will take you to the lower trail. We chose to go right and take the lower trail that follows along the river.

   

The trail is maintained, easy to follow, and follows right next to the Deschutes River. There are many geese in this area so there is poop everywhere and you will be hearing geese the whole time. This area was burned in the Substation Fire July of 2018, there is a lot of burned ground, trees and shrubs. We could already see new growth which was encouraging!

   

Follow along the river and pass a pump house and a cable that crosses the river. There will be a split in the trail go left uphill to get on the middle trail. Staying on the lower trail will eventually take you to a rock slide area and you have to scramble around to keep up with the trail, we did this and don’t recommend it. Back on the middle trail you will be above the river now and get nice views of the surrounding hills. You will soon come to a big bend in the river as it hooks left and you can see the rock slide below and a natural arch formation. We hiked about another half mile down the trail from the arch where you get past the bend and the river straightens out again. We made this our turn around area, head back out the way you came in. The Deschutes River Trail is a little over 11 miles one way so you could definitely extend your hike if you have the time. Stopping where we did would give you a 5 mile hike.

   

Distance: 5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 300 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the trailhead and about 1-1.5 miles in on the trail

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: On nice weekends

Warnings: Ticks and snakes

Three Corner Rock (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take I-84 to Cascade Locks and cross the Bridge Of The Gods ($2 toll). Take a right onto Hwy 14 and drive for a little over a half mile and take a right where it’s signed for Skamania Lodge. In .3 miles take a left onto Foster Creek Road. In about another mile take a left onto Red Bluff Road. Drive for about .6 miles (the road will turn to gravel) and keep right onto CG 2000. In just less than 2 miles take a left on CG 2000 at a junction. Follow the road for a little over 5.5 miles and go left at a junction with CG 2070. Drive another 2 miles and there is a 3 way junction, stay to the far left. The trailhead is about .3 miles on your right.

From the trailhead (make sure you start at the trailhead on the right side of the road) follow the trail as you steadily gain elevation. You will switchback three times as you climb the ridge. Avalanche lilies and vanilla leaf were in full bloom and there were even some lingering bleeding hearts left too. You will pass a short side trail that is somewhat overgrown and hard to pick out but it takes you to a great viewpoint of Mt. Adams.

      

      

At about the 1.5 mile mark you will come to a signed trail junction. Go right and follow the trail that is more evenly graded and will take you to an ATV road. Go right on the road (it’s not in great shape with large potholes and washouts, but it is still easy to walk on.) and follow it a short distance until you reach the top and see Three Corner Rock to your right.

      

      

Once at the top you will have amazing views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Jefferson, Mt. Adams, Mt. St. Helens, and Mt. Rainier! You will also be seeing Table Mountain, Dog Mountain, Wind Mountain and so much more! The beargrass was just starting to bloom but the paintbrush was in full bloom- it was beautiful. You can go all the way up Three Corner Rock (be cautious because the last little bit is kind of sketchy). Make sure you do this hike on a clear day, the 360 degree view is really what make this hike special. Head back out the way you came in.

      

      

Distance: 4 miles (easy)

Elevation: 950 feet (moderate/hard)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most (may be too hard for young kids and older folks)

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: Washington Discover Pass

Seasons: Mid spring- Fall

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Little Crater Lake To Timothy Lake (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take Highway 26 past Government Camp and Frog Lake to Skyline Road. Follow Skyline Road to Abbott Road (there are signs for Little Crater Lake). Take Abbott Road to the Little Crater Lake Campground. Drive through the campground to the end where there is a small parking area at the trailhead.

From the parking area get onto the narrow paved path that cuts through a meadow. Follow this a short distance and you’ll briefly enter and wooded area and come to Little Crater Lake. The lake is more the size of a pond but it’s color is amazing, it’s best viewed with the sun shining on it so you can really see the color.

      

      

Continue on the boardwalk trail through a marshy area full of skunk cabbage before going back into a wooded area. Pass through a horse fence and come the a trail junction. Go left here and follow the wide flat trail for a while until you come to a second intersection. Go left again and follow the boardwalk to a bridge over Little Crater Creek.

      

      

This bridge takes you to a trail that follows along the creek for a while until you come to the arm of Timothy Lake. It’s a pretty green color and fairly narrow compared to the actual lake. The trail continues to follow the arm of the lake and gradually rollercoasters but nothing too steep. You will pass a few campsites as you come to Timothy Lake. Keep following the trail and you will see a few side trails that take you down to the edge of the lake, any one of these make a good place to hangout and have lunch before heading back. Head back out the way you came in.

      

      

Distance: 4.5 Miles (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: Late spring through fall

Popular: Yes

Warnings: None