Tag Archives: Henline Falls

Henline Falls (Autumn)

Directions: Drive I-5 South to exit 253. Take a left and get onto Highway 22 and drive for a little over 22 miles until you come to a blinking light intersection, go left onto North Fork Road. Drive about 15.5 miles and the road will turn from pavement to gravel (note: there is a short gravel section earlier but it quickly returns to pavement). The gravel road now become FR 2209 and you enter the Opal Creek Wilderness. Continue for about a mile and a half (keep left at a split in the road) and you will see the Henline Falls trailhead on the left. Warning: The gravel road has MANY potholes, some of them pretty large. We saw all different types of cars at the trailhead and only one (a Fiat) seemed to have a problem.

The trailhead is not marked but there is a small wooden kiosk (someone has written ‘Henline Falls’ in sharpie but it’s small) and a pullout with enough room for about 3 or 4 cars.

      

From here get on the trail as you gradually head uphill. The trail is actually an old access road so it’s fairly wide in areas and pretty rocky. The trail is lined with large ferns and there is a lot of moss everywhere. You can hear Henline Creek below as you follow the trail to a split. Go left here and the trail narrows a bit and levels out. Soon you will enter a small burned area where there is a few eroded spots but they are easily passable. After the burn area you’ll start to see the waterfall off in the distance. You will pass by some old mining remnants and reach the end of the trail at Henline Falls. You can easily scramble down to the base of the waterfall where there are large boulders, and the small but colorful pool at the base of the falls.

      

      

Henline Falls is very pretty and quite tall. There was a good amount of spray coming off it as well which didn’t allow us to hangout at the base very long. Getting back up on the trail you still get a great view and will be less soggy. 

      

Head back out the way you came in.

 

Distance: 2 miles (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

For For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All. Check snow levels during winter.

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Best Of 2016

We did a lot of great hikes in 2016, here are some of our favorites and our overall top hike of the year.

  • Willamette Valley:

Henline Falls– This is a short hike but it takes you to an amazing waterfall. Catch it at the right time of day and you might just see a rainbow at the base as well!

  • Columbia River Gorge:

Columbia Hills State Park– Great area to see wildflowers with amazing views of the Gorge.

  • Washington:

Lewis River Falls– So many pretty waterfalls in such a short distance. Definitely a must see.

  • Coast:

The Thumb– This was probably the most unique hike we did this year.

  • Central Oregon:

Smith Rock (Misery Ridge)– The views are amazing at the top and you get a very up close view of Monkey Face!

  • Mt. Hood:

Wind Lake– You get to ride a chairlift up to the top of Ski Bowl and then hike to a somewhat hidden lake. And the whole time you have great views of Mt. Hood and Government Camp. 

  • Portland:

Powell Butte- This is a great hike in the city. On a clear day you can see Mt. Hood, Mt. St Helens, and Mt. Hood.

  • Southern Oregon:

Plaikni Falls– This hike was inside Crater Lake National Park, it’s very pretty, especially in autumn with all the beautiful colors.

  • Kayak:

Disappearing Lake– This was such a treat! It’s a lake that’s only around for about a month out of the whole year.

Overall Best of 2016:

Bald Mountain– The hike up bald mountain is beautiful and lined with beargrass. Once at the top you round a corner and come to one of the best views of Mt. Hood we’ve ever seen. Do this hike!

What were some of your favorite hikes in 2016? Any you’re looking forward to doing in 2017?

 

Henline Falls (Spring)

Directions: Drive I-5 South to exit 253. Take a left and get onto Highway 22 and drive for a little over 22 miles until you come to a blinking light intersection, go left onto North Fork Road. Drive about 15.5 miles and the road will turn from pavement to gravel (note: there is a short gravel section earlier but it quickly returns to pavement). The gravel road now become FR 2209 and you enter the Opal Creek Wilderness. Continue for about a mile and a half (keep left at a split in the road) and you will see the Henline Falls trailhead on the left. Warning: The gravel road has MANY potholes, some of them pretty large. We saw all different types of cars at the trailhead and only one (a Fiat) seemed to have a problem. Just be aware and decide how much you’re willing to put your car through. We drove this road in the summer of 2013 and it has changed a lot since then.

The first part of this trail is an old access road and it’s fairly wide and pretty rocky. It’s heavily treelined as you gradually head uphill to a split in the trail. At the split stay left as the trail gets closer to Henline Creek. Soon you will enter the burn area, the trail just recently opened after a wildfire above the trail caused the hillside to become unstable. There are some burned out trees and the trail is eroding a bit so it’s kinda skinny in this area.

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A short distance later you will start seeing the waterfall as the trail takes you past some old mining remnants. The trail ends at the base of Henline Falls where there are plenty of rocks to hangout on and eat lunch or relax. There is an old mining shaft on the right side of the waterfall, you can’t go in very far but it’s interesting to look at. This is an out and back hike so head back the way you came.

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Distance: 2 miles

Elevation: 200 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: No

Seasons: All but check before going during winter months.

Popular: No

Overall: This is a beautiful waterfall and a nice addition to other hikes in the area.