Tag Archives: Flowers

Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge- Carty Lake Hike (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take I-5 north to exit 14. Go left at the intersection after getting off the freeway. Follow the road for about 3 miles through downtown Ridgefield. Go right at an intersection with Main St and drive for about a mile until you see a sign for the Carty Unit of the Refuge. Follow the gravel road to the parking area.

From the parking area cross the bridge over the railroad tracks and follow the ramp down to the gravel trail. Follow the trail past the plankhouse and take a left at the trail junction.

      

      

The trail goes past duck lake and winds around as you go over a small footbridge. You’ll enter a treelined area and in the spring you can see a lot of birds in this area. We lucked out and briefly saw a Virginia Rail. Keep following the trail and you’ll see Carty Lake off to your left.

      

      

The trail continues and heads left, with the lake off to your left as well. The trail goes all the way to the end of the lake. Head back out the way you came in.

      

      

Since you already paid the entrance fee make sure you head to the ‘S’ Unit of the refuge a few miles away. You can take the driving tour where there is a LOT of wildlife to see.

      

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 60 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No dogs are not allowed in the preserve

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: $3 per car

Seasons: Carty Lake is open May-Sept

Popular: Yes on nice weekends

Warnings: None

Tom McCall Nature Preserve & Rowena Plateau (Spring 2018)

Directions: Drive east on I-84 and take exit 69 for Mosier. Turn right and follow the Old Highway into Mosier. Continue on the Old Highway for about 7 miles. There will be a big sign marking Rowena Crest and gravel parking areas.

We started over at the Rowena Crest Viewpoint to get a view of the road “loop” below. We then went a short distance into Tom McCall Nature Preserve. We walked until the poison oak got thick and decided to turn back.

      

Next we crossed the road and went to Rowena Plateau. It’s a very easy to follow short trail that ends at the point of the plateau. You get great views of the Gorge along with the wildflowers.

      

      

The most common wildflowers you’ll see are balsamroot and lupine. But depending on the month you’ll see other wildflowers like bachelor button, wild cucumber, buttercups and many others.

      

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 110 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No. Dogs are not allowed on this trail.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes especially during wildflower season

Warnings: Tick and poison oak

Mosier Plateau (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69 (Mosier). Follow the old highway into Mosier and parking in the gravel parking lot just past the totem pole on the left side of the road.

From the parking area cross the bridge and find the trail on the right side of the road near a bench. The trail starts uphill and takes you to an old pioneer cemetery. Continue on the trail where it stays mostly evenly graded and you will come to Mosier Creek Falls down in the canyon off to the right.

      

      

Continuing on the trail you’ll start up the 16 switchbacks. There are four separate sets of stairs mixed into the switchbacks as well. The switchbacks are fairly long and make the hike less steep than it could be without them.

      

You’ll wind your way up to the top of Mosier Plateau where you will see a lot of wildflowers (mainly balsamroot and lupine) and amazing views of the Gorge. There are trails that wind around all over the plateau.

      

Head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 600 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: There is an outhouse by the totem pole

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes during spring wildflower season

Warnings: Ticks and poison oak

Memaloose Hills (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69. Follow Highway 30 east and in 3 miles you will see the Memaloose Overlook sign with a gravel parking lot on the left.

From the parking area carefully cross the road and pick up the trail. The trail heads uphill gradually and you’ll instantly start seeing wildflowers. There is a home off to your right and eventually the trail levels off a bit.

      

Next, the trail heads downhill to a very small stream that you can step over. Down in this area we saw a lot of chocolate lilies. After crossing the stream the trail splits off, each trail taking you to a different hill. We went straight/left first- towards Marsh Hill. This is the less steep of the two hills. There was a lot of balsamroot blooming and the lupine was just starting. You’ll get a nice view of Mt. Hood off to your right. Head back down to the trail junction when you’re done.

      

      

Take the other trail through a grassy field, it was filled with buttercup while we were here which was great. You’ll pass a farm to your left as you enter a more oak tree filled area. The trail starts heading uphill in this area and you’ll start seeing a lot of balsamroot. The trail will open up again to Chatfield Hill that is covered in balsamroot, lupine, paintbrush and other wildflowers. The trail heads uphill and is pretty steep in sections. Once at the top on a clear day you will have a view of Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, and the Gorge. It’s definitely the better of the two hills.

      

      

Head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 550 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most- there are some steep sections heading up each hill

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: During spring wildflower bloom

Warnings: Ticks and poison oak

Drift Creek Falls (Spring)

Directions: From Portland take I-5 South to exit 294 for 99W. Take 99W through Newberg and Dundee for 22.9 miles, then take a left for Highway 18 (Dayton/Oregon Coast). Take Highway 18 for 48 miles and pass through Grand Ronde and reach Rose Lodge where you will take a left onto Bear Creek Road (there is a sign for Drift Creek Falls). Drive 3 miles (the last part of this road is gravel but in good condition) where you will come to a junction and stay straight (the pavement begins again here). Quickly you will come to another junction, go left onto Forest Road 17 which is a one lane paved road. Drive another 1.5 miles and stay right at a junction for Drift Creek Camp. In another 3.5 miles you will come to a junction, stay right on the paved road.  About a mile later you will come to the trailhead on the left.

We love this coast range hike and finally had the chance to visit again. The large suspension bridge and waterfall are the draw but the hike itself is beautiful and moss covered- it never disappoints!

      

The trail starts out heading downhill gradually on a long switchback. The trail switches from downhill to flat off and on as you cross a couple footbridges.

      

Soon you’ll come to a split in the trail. They both take you to the same place but going left (uphill) is a little harder and adds a bit of distance to the hike, but it’s not as busy! On the way in we went on the main trail and the way back we took the upper trail.

      

Continuing on you’ll round a ridge and go over another footbridge when you get to creek level. You’ll also pass through a lovely area that’s covered in moss, it really gives you that storybook feel! Soon after you will reach the large suspension bridge (it’s 240 feet long and 100 feet above the creek) that takes you over drift creek. About halfway across the bridge you get a really nice view of Drift Creek Falls below.

      

      

Once across continue following the trail as it switches back down to the base of the waterfall.

Upper Trail

Upper Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head back out the way you came in.

 

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 500 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival (2018)

The Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival is located in Woodburn, Oregon and is running through May 6th this year.

Another year visiting the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival! We’ve had some wacky spring weather so far and we weren’t sure if we’d make it out to the fields with all the rain and wind. We lucked out and got a somewhat dry, but still windy day.

      

The tulips were great and we really liked the setup of the field this year. About 75% of the flowers were in bloom during our visit. They have extended the dates into May due to the weather which is great.

      

Make sure you get here early as it gets busy quickly and don’t forget to bring your boots- it’s very muddy! There are lots of activities for kids and craft/food booths. Don’t forget to stop by the tent where they make wooden shoes!

      

Both of the gift shop areas are great and we took home a pot of tulips that we are still enjoying on our front porch.

Check the website (tagged above) for hours and prices.

Oregon’s 7 Wonders

Travel Oregon came up with Oregon’s 7 Wonders and we’ve slowly been checking them out over the past few years. They’re spread out all over Oregon which is great because it really gives you a chance to see a lot of the state.

This August we finally checked off the last wonder and here’s what we thought of them…

The Columbia River Gorge:

We’ve visited this wonder so many times we’ve lost count, starting when we were both kids, and have very fond memories of this area. It’s a little bitter sweet due to the recent wildfire that ravaged the area but this area is so large that there is still places to visit, and we can’t wait until the trails reopen and we get to see this beautiful place again. We know it will take a lot of time, but the Gorge will come back stronger than ever.

Waterfalls, views, and wildflowers…a Gorge trail will take you somewhere amazing!

      

      

Some of our favorite Gorge hikes are Fairy Falls, Larch Mountain, and Wahclella Falls. If you’re Looking for a good lunch spot check out The Ranch for a good burger in Hood River.

The Oregon Coast:

This is another wonder that we’ve visited countless times. Some of our favorite cities are Newport, Pacific City, and Lincoln City. Oregonians know that the coast really is an all season place. A perfect summer day is amazing but a nice winter storm is fun too! Tide pools and lighthouses are some of our favorite things to check out at the coast along with all the great hiking.

      

      

Some great hikes in the area University Falls, Cape Falcon, and Drift Creek Falls. If you’re looking for some good food check out Pacific Oyster in Bay City.

Smith Rock:

We’ve been to Smith Rock three times and it’s amazing. The hikes are great and you can’t really go wrong with any trail you pick. Our personal favorite is Misery Ridge, it may be a bit difficult but it’s well worth the extra energy spent. With the Snake River Gorge winding through the large tuff and basalt rock formations it’s easy to see why this area made the list.

      

      

Make sure to stop by Juniper Junction (Rockhard) for some tasty huckleberry ice cream.

The Painted Hills:

Probably the most unique place on the list with all of the bright colored hills. There’s so much to see here you’ll need to plan for most of the day to really explore this place. There are trails that take you up hills to allow you views of the whole area. Off to one side you’ll see large hills with yellow, red and purple paintbrush type strokes on them, and then if you look another direction you’ll see smaller hills that are deep red or bright yellow-gold. Make sure to check out the trails that go around the smaller hills, it’s really amazing to see the texture and colors up close.

      

      

For more info on the trails click here.

Crater Lake:

Crater Lake is a Caldera Lake that’s very large and very blue. You can drive around the whole crater rim and there are many trails around the caldera. After spending time at some of the many viewpoints and getting a good look at the lake and wizard island make sure to make some time to explore the trails. A few of our favorites are Plaikni Falls and The Pinnacles.

      

      

While you’re in the area make sure to check out Toketee Falls.

The Wallowas:

Way out in eastern Oregon are the Wallowa Mountains, near the town of Joseph. They call it the Swiss Alps of Oregon and we can definitely see why. The best and easiest way to see the Wallowa Mountains are to take the tramway up to the top of Mt. Howard. Wallowa Lake is also a big attraction in this area, the lake is huge and it offers great views of the mountains as well. There are a ton of beautiful barns in the area, stop at the visitor center in Joseph for a map of where you can find them all.

      

      

We recommend the famous mountain berry shake at the Eagle Cap Chalet and a burger from the Glacier Grill.

Mt. Hood:

Of course the Mt. Hood area would make this list- it’s amazing! The mountain itself is beautiful as are the lakes and waterfalls that surround it. This area can’t be beat when it comes to winter activities too- ski, snowboard, snowshoe…you can seriously do it all.

      

      

Some of our favorite hikes in this area Bald Mountain, Umbrella Falls, Zigzag Canyon, and snowshoeing at White River West.

 

Oregon’s 7 Wonders are truly amazing and they really show off how great this state is, we’ll be back to visit them all again and again!

How many of the wonders have you seen? We’d love to hear what your favorite wonder is!

Mt. Howard- Tramway & Hike (Summer)

Directions: Take I-84 east to La Grande and go north on Hwy 82. Follow 82 into the town of Joseph. Take Main St. in Joseph through the town and head south the road turning into Wallowa Lake Hwy, it’s about 6 miles from the town of Joseph. Once in the Wallowa Lake area continue straight until you see the Tramway on your left a short distance later.

This hike has you take a Tramway from the base at 4,450′ to the top of Mt. Howard which is at 8,150′. It takes 15 minutes to get to the top and offers amazing views of the Wallowa Mountains and Wallowa Lake. The cost is $33 per adult, for child and senior prices, as well as other information click here.

After enjoying the short but spectacular tram ride you’ll be let out by the Summit Grill and this is where the hiking portion starts. We started with the smaller loop that takes you to three viewpoints. The trails are very well manicured, it does take away from the nature aspect of the hike but this place is very busy and we understand the need for it. The trails are mostly packed dirt and rock. There are a lot of shrubs and dwarfed trees, as well as some very wind ravaged trees that are bent and curled. In this first loop there is a staircase to get to the top viewpoint. All of the viewpoints in this loop have fantastic views of the Wallowa Mountains.

      

Next we headed east toward the larger loop that takes you past two viewpoints. There are more trees over here and we saw some lingering purple lupine which was great. We saw mountain bluebirds, vultures, crossbills, and many other birds on this loop. The views on this side are of the Snake River and Wallowa Lake. At the north tip you’ll come to a viewpoint with a windsock, this is the launch site for people who are paragliding/hang gliding. There’s a bench here and within minutes of sitting down we had little chipmunks crawling all over us. Please do NOT feed the animals it’s not good for them, as tempting as their cute little faces are.

      

This is a very tourist heavy place and sometimes that can be a little annoying. But the tram was fun and the loops do give you very nice views of the area. We would recommend going during the week and as early as possible.

      

Even with the wildfire smoke this place is still pretty awesome. Your tram ticket is good for the WHOLE DAY too, so ride that baby as many times as you can!

      

Distance: 2.6 miles (easy)

Elevation: 325 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None- just the tramway fee.

Seasons: May-Oct

Popular: Very

Warnings: People that have issues with heights may not enjoy the tram ride to the top.

Zumwalt Prairie- Patti’s Trail (Summer)

Directions: From the town of Enterprise take Highway 82 towards Joseph for about 3 miles. Turn left on Crow Creek Road and go 5 miles. Turn right onto Zumwalt/Buckhorn Road and drive for about 14 miles to the junction of Zumwalt/Buckhorn and Duckett Road. Turn right on Duckett Road and drive for about 1.5 miles to the barn on the right side of the road. This is the Duckett Barn and there is a small pullout and kiosk, this is where you park for this hike.

Be aware that a good amount of the drive is on a dirt road. It was in pretty good shape but there were potholes and it’s a pretty slow go.

From the parking area cross the road and head off on the narrow trail that cuts straight through tall grass. There are small posts with arrows that lead you through this whole hike. The dirt trail starts out level as you go through the prairie and cut through a few barbed wire fences. You’ll gradually start to head downhill slightly as you pass the headwaters of Camp Creek. We were here in early August and there was barely a trickle here so it was hard to figure out exactly where the creek actually started. Down in here we saw a short eared owl, ferruginous hawk and red tailed hawk.

      

The trail levels out again and follows along the creek with hills on either side of the trail. Down here there was a lot of thistle growing and a ton of butterflies! It was amazing to see all the different types. As the trail wraps around the base of a hill you’ll come to where the trail splits, go left where you head up a hill and get good views of the prairie.

      

The trail dips again and then heads back up and back to the prairie. There are two places where you have to climb up some steps that take you over the fence, it’s not too hard but just be aware for older folks and younger kids. As you follow the arrows back through the meadow you’ll connect with the first part of the trail that takes you back to your car.

      

We did this hike during a very dry time so the creek was non existent and the grass was dry and poky. There was also a lot of smoke from the surrounding wildfires. It was still a nice hike but we’re excited to come back when the wildflowers are blooming and things are a bit more alive.

       

It’s a great place to birdwatch- we saw savannah sparrows, western kingbirds, barn swallows, as well as the birds mentioned above and much more. We also saw a few deer and lots of cows on the drive in!

      

Distance: 2.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 150 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Dogs are not allowed in Zumwalt Prairie.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site (Summer)

Directions: Drive I-84 east to La Grande, go north on Highway 82 and follow it into the town of Joseph. Once in Joseph follow Main St. through to the south end of town where the road curves and turns into 8th St. The Park is on the right.

We took a little trip out to Eastern Oregon and this was our first stop. We did an evening hike which was great for wildlife viewing.

From the small parking area head up the dirt path that has a few longer switchbacks and takes you to the top of a small hill. You get views down into a meadow and the Wallowa Mountains off in the distance. The trail soon heads back downhill and follows along the meadow and Silver Lake Ditch, we saw a few deer here which was great. There were many birds in the trees along the trail as well.

      

Soon you’ll come to a split in the trail, we went right towards Knight’s Pond that you can walk around. We also took the trail to the left of the pond and walked along a offshoot of the Wallowa River. Both the pond and the stream are very pretty, there are a couple small bridges over both.

      

From here we wondered around a little bit and then headed out the way we came in. This whole area is very scenic with the mountains, pond, and stream. Add in the deer and how quiet it was and we were very happy we decided to check this place out.

      

Make sure to stop and read some of the informational signs to learn about the history of this beautiful area!

We were here during some pretty intense wildfire smoke and can’t wait to come back when it’s clear out, to get even better views of the Wallowa Mountains. The smoke did make for a pretty great sunset though!

Distance: 2 miles (easy)

Elevation: 80 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Can be on nice weekends. Seems to be quiet on weekdays.

Warnings: People have seen bears in the area.