Tag Archives: Berries

University Falls (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 West and then get on Highway 6 (for Banks and Tillamook). After about 19 miles on Highway 6 take a left at the road for Rogers Camp. Go right at the split so you’re on Saddle Mountain Road. Follow the road (staying right at all the splits) for about 3 miles, the road is always signed for University Falls. The trailhead is on the right side of the road and well marked. It’s a gravel road with a few potholes but it’s pretty well maintained. Watch for logging trucks and ATV’s

Last time we were here we happened to pick a day with a huge trail run going through the area. This time was much better since we didn’t have to dodge people running up on us out of nowhere 😆

From the small parking area get on the trail that starts out heading uphill gradually. You will soon come to a ATV crossing, after this crossing the trail starts heading downhill. There were a lot more flowers this time, the salal was blooming all along the trail as well as some wild daisies and tiny lupine.

      

After passing the large clearcut area off to your right the trail levels out again and curves left. The sign for the waterfall was knocked down this time but the trail off to the left is overgrown but still obvious. Along this side trail was some muddy areas that were a haven for mosquitoes but quick to pass through. You’ll quickly see the creek and then University Falls off in the distance.

      Head back out the way you came in.

The trail was a little better this time around with the flowers but the clearcut is still ugly. It takes away from what could be a very pretty coast range hike.

 

Distance: .8 mile (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Season: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Upper and Lower Latourell Falls (Spring)

Directions: Take I-84 east to Exit 28 (Bridal Veil). Get onto the Old Highway heading right for about 2.5 miles until you reach the Latourell Falls parking area.

From the parking area go left up the paved path that takes you to a view point of Lower Latourell Falls. Continue left on the dirt trail that heads somewhat steeply uphill, you will come to a bench and another view of the waterfall. The trail continues uphill as you switchback a few times and reach the top of the waterfall.

      

From here the trail levels out a bit and you cross over a couple foot bridges before reaching Upper Latourell Falls. Spring is a great time to hike this trail, it was lined with trillium, bleeding heart, and salmon berry was flowering. Water levels are also great in spring with snow melt, which makes for some very full and pretty waterfalls.

      

From the upper falls continue on the trail where it is mostly level for the first bit and then switches back downhill a couple times and heads gradually downhill. Soon you will fork left and head uphill steeply to a viewpoint of the Gorge. From here you head downhill on one long switchback that takes you down to the old highway.

      

After crossing the highway you can either head back to your car or take the steps down into the park if you want to see the base of the lower falls. If you choose to continue on, follow the paved path through the park and under the highway bridge. A short distance later you will reach the base of the waterfall, from here you just follow the path uphill where it drops you back at the parking area.

      

Distance: 2.25 miles

Elevation: 520 feet

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Overall: We highly recommend this time of year for this trail- it’s beautiful!

Best Of 2016

We did a lot of great hikes in 2016, here are some of our favorites and our overall top hike of the year.

  • Willamette Valley:

Henline Falls– This is a short hike but it takes you to an amazing waterfall. Catch it at the right time of day and you might just see a rainbow at the base as well!

  • Columbia River Gorge:

Columbia Hills State Park– Great area to see wildflowers with amazing views of the Gorge.

  • Washington:

Lewis River Falls– So many pretty waterfalls in such a short distance. Definitely a must see.

  • Coast:

The Thumb– This was probably the most unique hike we did this year.

  • Central Oregon:

Smith Rock (Misery Ridge)– The views are amazing at the top and you get a very up close view of Monkey Face!

  • Mt. Hood:

Wind Lake– You get to ride a chairlift up to the top of Ski Bowl and then hike to a somewhat hidden lake. And the whole time you have great views of Mt. Hood and Government Camp. 

  • Portland:

Powell Butte- This is a great hike in the city. On a clear day you can see Mt. Hood, Mt. St Helens, and Mt. Hood.

  • Southern Oregon:

Plaikni Falls– This hike was inside Crater Lake National Park, it’s very pretty, especially in autumn with all the beautiful colors.

  • Kayak:

Disappearing Lake– This was such a treat! It’s a lake that’s only around for about a month out of the whole year.

Overall Best of 2016:

Bald Mountain– The hike up bald mountain is beautiful and lined with beargrass. Once at the top you round a corner and come to one of the best views of Mt. Hood we’ve ever seen. Do this hike!

What were some of your favorite hikes in 2016? Any you’re looking forward to doing in 2017?

 

Wind Lake (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 East to Skibowl.

We decided to do this hike with the Sky Chair. If you don’t want to ride the lift you can definitely hike up to the lake. It would be an out and back hike, just follow what we did in reverse 🙂

If you decide to take the lift head into the guest services/ticket sales store and get your tickets for the UPPER bowl. You will be going to the very top of Skibowl. Tickets are $18 per person. Make sure to also get a free trail map while you are there, it’s helpful.

After you get your tickets and get on the lift you will first be heading over the Alpine Slide. Stay on the lift and pass the slide, as you continue up you will be going over some of the trails that  you will be using to hike out. When you get to the top of the lower bowl get off and follow the trail to your right, there is a sign marked for Upper Bowl. This trail is short and heads downhill crossing a bike trail and ends at the upper bowl lift.

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Get on the second lift and take it to the very top of Ski Bowl. Once you get off first head to your right and up a short hill to take in the awesome view of Mt. Hood, Ski Bowl, and Government Camp. It was a clear day so we could also see Mt. Adams, Mt. Rainier, and Mt. St. Helens! It got even better when we looked South and saw Mt. Jefferson! Head back down the hill and take Skyline Road downhill a short distance where you will see a small sign on your right marking the Wind Lake Trail. Follow this trail somewhat steeply downhill for one mile where it ends right at the lake. We did this hike on a nice summer weekend and we didn’t see a single person at the lake. The lake is pretty small but still very pretty. There are plenty of places to hangout and have lunch or just relax for a bit.

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Head back out the Wind Lake trail and back onto Skyline Road. Go right and continue following Skyline Road for about a mile, you will pass tons of views of Mt. Hood along the way. Skyline Road turns into High Road (it’s signed) which you will follow for about a quarter mile. This takes you under the lower bowl lift and to the historic warming hut. After you pass the warming hut follow the trail downhill and around a corner where you will get onto the Gnar Gnar trail. It’s a switchback heavy trail but hikers can go straight through the switchbacks. It’s steep and has a lot of loose rocks but isn’t too bad. You will be hiking right next to the Alpine Slide and there are lots of wildflowers in the grass around here. The trail ends at the base of Skibowl.

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*Warning* Almost all of the trails you will be hiking on are shared trails so you will see lots of mountain bikers and maybe a few horses. The mountain bikers are riding very fast so please keep your eyes and ears open. They come up behind you quickly and the trail intersections can be a bit sketchy.

Distance: 4.8 miles if you are taking the Sky Chair, 9.8 miles if you are hiking out and back.

Elevation: With the lift: You will lose 1,400 feet of elevation hiking from Skyline Road back to your car, but you will also have to hike out from the lake which is 507 feet. If you are hiking out and back: 1,400 feet plus the lake loss and gain.

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: We saw dogs down at the base but none on the trail. Call before taking them.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes by the ticket store.

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: Varies. It depends when Skibowl opens for summer attractions.

Popular: Very busy down by the Alpine Slide. Lots of Mountain bikers but not many hikers.

Overall: This was a fun hike. The Sky Chair added something new and gave us great views. The lake was nice and quiet and the hike was fun.

Ankeny Wildlife Refuge (Rail Trail) (Summer)

Directions: Drive I-5 South to exit 243. Go right onto Ankeny Hill Road and at a stop sign go left onto Wintel Road. Follow this road until you come to a road on the left marked for the Rail Trail. Follow the gravel road down to the parking area.

From the parking area get on the trail and follow it by a field and into a more heavily wooded section. You will soon come to a split in the trail, go right onto the boardwalk. Following the boardwalk you will pass a bird blind that looks out over a marshy area. The boardwalk continues on over a swampy section as you come back out to an open area. At the end of the boardwalk you can go left and take a look at the ponds before back tracking back to the boardwalk and going right.

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Follow the grassy trail along the marsh area for a while as you start to round around and follow near the road. You will come to a side trail on the left that ends at a green gate. Go around the gate and cross the road where you will find another side trail that takes you to a boardwalk trail. Follow the boardwalk a short distance to another bird blind that looks out over another marsh area. Backtrack to the road and cross it back to the gate and get back on the grass trail. Keep going on this trail where there are lots of blackberry bushes that are full of berries in July.

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This trail takes you back to the gravel road you drove in on. Go right on the road and follow it back to your car.

While at the refuge we were able to see Great Blue Heron’s, Robins, American Goldfinch, Northern Flickers, Song Sparrows, Yellow Warblers, Cedar Waxwings, and more!

Distance 2- 3.5 miles (depends on if you look at all the ponds)

Elevation: 0

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: No. Dogs are not allowed in the wildlife refuge.

Good For: All ages.

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All. Parts of the trail are closed from Oct-Apr

Popular: No

Overall: Nice quiet area that’s great for bird lovers, may be a little boring for others.

Summer Hikes

Looking for a nice summer hike? Here’s a list of some of our favorites 🙂

If you’re looking to stay in Portland and the surrounding cities check out Oak Island, Mt. Talbert, or Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge. They are all easy hikes that have decent shade and lots of birds.

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We love hitting up all the great trails that the Mt. Hood area has to offer during the summer months. Tamanawas Falls and Umbrella Falls are great options if you are looking for a waterfall hike. For a lake hike check out Mirror Lake (and Tom, Dick, and Harry Ridge!), and Lower Twin Lake. Zigzag Canyon is also a really fun hike, go in mid to late June while the lupine is blooming!

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Some great summer Gorge hikes are Upper and Lower Latourell Falls, Gillette Lake, and Strawberry Island.

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Summer time is full of Kayaking as well, be sure to check out Scappoose Bay and Lost Lake!

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–Happy Hiking!

 

Klickitat River (Part 1 of 4)

The Klickitat trail is 16 miles (one way) and meets up with the Swale Canyon trail. We plan on doing all 16 miles in four sections, before the end of January (hopefully!). The four sections will either be out-and-back or one-way hikes.

This first section is from the Lyle Trailhead to the Fisher Hill Bridge Trailhead and it’s an out-and-back hike.

Directions: Take I-84 East to Hood River exit 64 (marked for White Salmon) and cross the Hood River Bridge ($1 toll). After crossing the bridge take a right onto Highway 14 and drive for about 11 miles. After crossing the Klickitat River take an immediate left onto Highway 142, and then another left into the parking area for the well marked Lyle Trailhead.

From the trailhead follow the path that enters into a treelined gravel trail. You will see a few houses to your left and Highway 142 will be very close on your right. A fair warning here, being so close to the highway there are a LOT of dead animals that have been hit by cars. Some are caught in the bushes, some have fallen in the trail. The smell was pretty awful in a few sections for the first 1/2 mile or so. It’s not pleasant but it definitely wasn’t bad enough for us to want to leave.

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This trail has mile markers which come in handy. For the first mile you’ll pass by a few houses and have a little road noise (the highway isn’t very busy). You are above the Klickitat Gorge and will get a few views. There are a lot of birds and small wildlife to see as well. It’s not the most interesting trail but it’s pretty. Right after the first mile marker there is a trail to the left that takes you down into the gorge. We recommend going, it gives you the best views of the gorge and river. The trail heads downhill and  you will soon start to see a lot of fishermen, we easily saw over 20 people fishing from the rocks. The trail goes on for over a quarter mile and eventually comes to an area of the gorge rocks that are flat that you can walk out on. You can also see the bridge off in the distance. You can continue on the side trail for a while longer but it doesn’t connect to the main trail. So, head back the way you came to get back on the main trail.

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Once you’re on the main trail again keep going for over a half mile and you will come to the Fisher Hill Bridge. It’s an old train bridge that has been converted into a pedestrian bridge. The bridge gives you nice views of the gorge and the surrounding hills. This is the turn around point for this section, head back out the way you came in.

Distance: 4 miles

Elevation: 65 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area.

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: Almost all, this trail does close during high fire danger times.

Popular: No

Overall: It’s not the most exciting hike but the Klickitat Gorge is beautiful and the trail is very well maintained making it accessible to many people. Plus, we’re birders and there were a lot of interesting birds to see 🙂

Sturgeon Lake (By Kayak) (Summer)

Directions: This hike is located on Sauvie Island. Drive over the Sauvie Island Bridge (stop at the Cracker Barrel Grocery for a day use pass). Continue down the road and stay right onto Reeder Road. Drive for a little over a mile and then take a left onto Oak Island Road. After about 3.5 miles on Oak Island Road the road turns to gravel. Continue on the gravel road and take a right onto an unmarked road that’s just past a pond. If you’ve crossed a cattle guard you’ve gone too far. Follow this road until it ends at the parking area for the lake.

There is a boat launch area but no dock. When the water is low there are rocks to stand on to get into your kayak so you wont have to get wet. Otherwise you might have to get a little wet to push off.

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Sturgeon Lake is pretty big and it has almost no current so it makes paddling really easy. When we first started out there was almost no wind and the lake was super flat and pretty. The lake is surrounded by farms and attached to other areas on the island. A lot of it is private property so be aware of the signs if you want to get out and wander around. A good place to get out would be around the Oak Island hiking area. You also get great views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams and Mt. St. Helens.

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The bottom of the lake is very muddy and you sink down pretty quickly, making it not the best place to get out and swim. There is a tide here as well so make sure you’re aware of the depth from time to time so you don’t get stranded. We saw some pretty good size fish jumping a few times and there are lots of birds as well.

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We were dealing with a time crunch so we didn’t get to explore as much of the lake as we would have liked. Overall it’s a nice area with not too many people. Great for anyone interested in birds. There is a small beach near the launch area that offers the only real shade around.

Distance: —

Elevation: —

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: $7 Sauvie Island fee. Make sure to purchase this at the little store that’s right on the main road after crossing the bridge onto the island.

Seasons: April-September

Popular: Can be on weekends and nice days.

Overall: Nice easy place to kayak. Great for wildlife viewing.

Lower Twin Lake (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 to the junction with Highway 35 stay left and continue on 26 for another 5 miles until you reach the Frog Lake Sno-Park on the left.

From the parking area take the trail that’s to the left of the bathroom, passing by a picnic table and garbage cans. Take a right past the garbage cans and you’ll be on the Pacific Crest Trail. The trail is wide and well maintained as you gradually hike uphill most of the way. There are a lot of downed trees for the first half of the hike and soon the trail switches back and uphill towards the junction for Twin Lakes.

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When you reach the junction take a right on Trail 495 marked for Twin Lakes. It starts out relatively flat as you pass a sign marking the Twin Lake summit elevation. After you pass this sign the trail begins gradually heading downhill as you make you’re way to Lower Twin Lake. You’ll even start to see the lake through the trees. The trail drops you off at the lake and you have the option to head left or right around the lake. There are a lot of campsites around the lake and it can become pretty busy in the summer months. Also, there are a lot of very friendly Gray Jays hanging around the campsites that will land on your hand and/or steal your food!

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As you make your way around the lake be sure to stop and pick a few huckleberries, over half of the lake is lined with huckleberry bushes! This is an out-and-back hike, so when you’re ready head back out the way you came in.

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Distance: 5 miles

Elevation: 700 feet

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most ages- this may be a harder hike for younger and older folks.

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Late spring to early fall.

Popular: No

Overall: Pretty lake and great huckleberry picking!

Junction Lake (Summer)

Directions: Take I-84 East to exit 44 (Cascade Locks) and cross the Bridge of the Gods ($2 toll). Take a right onto Highway 14 for about 6 miles until you see signs for Carson and Wind River Road. Take a left here and head through the town of Carson on Highway 30 for about 6 miles. Take a right onto Old State road and an immediate left onto Panther Creek Road (turns into Road 65). Follow this road for 11 miles until you reach an intersection called “Four Corners.” Take a right onto Road 60 (it’s a maintained gravel road) and follow it for about 8.5 miles. Take a left onto Road 6030 which is marked for East Crater Trail. Follow this road for a little over 4 miles (it will turn into Road 6035) to the trailhead on the left.

Right past the trailhead sign there is a wilderness permit station. Make sure you stop and fill out the paper and attach it to your backpack, so you don’t get fined.

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From the trailhead you start out in a very pretty wooded area with bear grass heavily lining the trail. The trail gradually starts heading uphill at first and then more steeply as you make you’re way through the woods. After about a mile and a half the trail will start to level out a bit and you’ll come to the first of three ponds. The mosquitoes are pretty terrible this time of year and from about the first pond you’ll start to really notice them. It only gets worse as you hike further in.

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As you keep hiking you’ll pass through meadows and by two more ponds, as well as through clouds of mosquitoes. The trail gets more level as you go and soon you’ll come to Junction Lake. There are a few trails that take you down to the small but pretty lake. The lake is tree lined with a nice open meadow on one side. There is a nice trail that goes all the way around the lake and plenty of places to sit and relax or eat lunch. This is an out and back hike, so head back the way you came.

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We really loved this hike, the forest is beautiful with all the bear grass and heather blooming. The meadows and ponds are really pretty and a nice contrast to the wooded areas. BUT, we must warn everyone that this is NOT a great hike during mosquito season, we absolutely wouldn’t recommend going late May through mid July. We weren’t able to relax and enjoy the lake as much as we would’ve liked, due to the mosquitoes being so thick and horrible. One of us left with 25 bites, it was that bad. That being said, we can’t wait to go back in the fall, it really is a lovely place minus the bugs 🙂

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Distance: 5.2 miles

Elevation: 730 feet

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most ages- may be hard for young kids and older folks.

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: No

Seasons: Late spring to late fall

Popular: No

Overall: The lake is pretty but the mosquitoes are so thick that it’s highly distracting. We would recommend doing this hike in late summer or fall.