Eagle Creek Wildfire

We’re sure by now that everyone is aware of the Eagle Creek Fire in the Columbia River Gorge. It was started by a firework, has grown to over 35,000 acres, and is 13% contained.

On September 4th we were in Washington across from the fire in North Bonneville. When we got there in the late afternoon we mostly saw smoke and some flames. There was also a few helicopters getting water from the Columbia to fight the fire. Within an hour the winds had picked up significantly and the fire spread before our eyes. It was scary to see, especially since we knew what was across from us, the Moffett Creek area and lots of amazing Gorge trails. I-84 closed and as we made our way back home on SR-14 we realized the fire had spread miles to the west.

This is a significant area burning- homes, businesses, historical buildings, and so much of the beloved Gorge is at risk. We can’t imagine the impact this is going to have on people and this great stretch of area.

At this point the best way to help is to make a donation to any one (or all!) of these amazing places:

*Friends Of The Columbia River Gorge – The only non-profit dedicated entirely to protecting the Gorge. That link takes you directly to where you can donate.

*Hood River County Search & Rescue– These are the men and women who helped rescue 153 hikers on the Eagle Creek Trail. The link takes you to their website, you can make a donation at any US Bank branch.

*Red Cross Cascade Region– These amazing people are running the evacuation centers for people displaced by the fire. The link takes you to the Cascade Region RC.

*Multnomah County Animal Services– They helped rescue animals that were displaced in the fire. The link takes you to a page describing how they helped, there is a link to donate there.

*Sound Equine Options– They worked in tandem with MCAS to help the larger animals get out of the path of the wildfire. This link takes you directly to a donation page.

Another great idea is to talk about trail safety and Leave No Trace principles with friends and family, especially the youngsters in your life. Sadly, a lot of wildfires are caused by humans- spreading knowledge can and will help that!

Lastly we’d like to acknowledge the great effort by all of the people fighting this fire. What an incredibly hard job, keep up the amazing work!

 

Here are some of the photos we took of what saw. We’re posting these as a reminder of the devastation that carelessness can cause.

      

 

      

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