Category Archives: Bridges

Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge- Carty Lake Hike (Spring 2018)

Directions: Take I-5 north to exit 14. Go left at the intersection after getting off the freeway. Follow the road for about 3 miles through downtown Ridgefield. Go right at an intersection with Main St and drive for about a mile until you see a sign for the Carty Unit of the Refuge. Follow the gravel road to the parking area.

From the parking area cross the bridge over the railroad tracks and follow the ramp down to the gravel trail. Follow the trail past the plankhouse and take a left at the trail junction.

      

      

The trail goes past duck lake and winds around as you go over a small footbridge. You’ll enter a treelined area and in the spring you can see a lot of birds in this area. We lucked out and briefly saw a Virginia Rail. Keep following the trail and you’ll see Carty Lake off to your left.

      

      

The trail continues and heads left, with the lake off to your left as well. The trail goes all the way to the end of the lake. Head back out the way you came in.

      

      

Since you already paid the entrance fee make sure you head to the ‘S’ Unit of the refuge a few miles away. You can take the driving tour where there is a LOT of wildlife to see.

      

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 60 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No dogs are not allowed in the preserve

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: $3 per car

Seasons: Carty Lake is open May-Sept

Popular: Yes on nice weekends

Warnings: None

Drift Creek Falls (Spring)

Directions: From Portland take I-5 South to exit 294 for 99W. Take 99W through Newberg and Dundee for 22.9 miles, then take a left for Highway 18 (Dayton/Oregon Coast). Take Highway 18 for 48 miles and pass through Grand Ronde and reach Rose Lodge where you will take a left onto Bear Creek Road (there is a sign for Drift Creek Falls). Drive 3 miles (the last part of this road is gravel but in good condition) where you will come to a junction and stay straight (the pavement begins again here). Quickly you will come to another junction, go left onto Forest Road 17 which is a one lane paved road. Drive another 1.5 miles and stay right at a junction for Drift Creek Camp. In another 3.5 miles you will come to a junction, stay right on the paved road.  About a mile later you will come to the trailhead on the left.

We love this coast range hike and finally had the chance to visit again. The large suspension bridge and waterfall are the draw but the hike itself is beautiful and moss covered- it never disappoints!

      

The trail starts out heading downhill gradually on a long switchback. The trail switches from downhill to flat off and on as you cross a couple footbridges.

      

Soon you’ll come to a split in the trail. They both take you to the same place but going left (uphill) is a little harder and adds a bit of distance to the hike, but it’s not as busy! On the way in we went on the main trail and the way back we took the upper trail.

      

Continuing on you’ll round a ridge and go over another footbridge when you get to creek level. You’ll also pass through a lovely area that’s covered in moss, it really gives you that storybook feel! Soon after you will reach the large suspension bridge (it’s 240 feet long and 100 feet above the creek) that takes you over drift creek. About halfway across the bridge you get a really nice view of Drift Creek Falls below.

      

      

Once across continue following the trail as it switches back down to the base of the waterfall.

Upper Trail

Upper Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head back out the way you came in.

 

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 500 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

Multnomah Falls- Post Fire

A few weeks ago the lower viewing platform of Multnomah Falls was reopened after the devastating Eagle Creek Fire. Most of the Historic Columbia River Highway is still closed so the only parking area that’s open is the one on I-84.

You can definitely see the fire damage up on the top of the ridge and down the sides. They have put up a lot of fencing to help with rock fall as well. The waterfall itself looks the same and the Benson Bridge *seems* to be undamaged. The trails are all still closed and probably will be for some time.

      

Everyone is excited to check out the Gorge as it slowly starts to reopen- it was very crowded when we were here early on a Saturday. We’d recommend maybe heading this way on a weekday if you don’t want to fight through a sea of people.

      

We’ll keep updating the blog as more trails open.

Bridal Veil Falls (Spring)

Directions: Take I-84 East to Bridal Veil exit #28. Take a right onto the Historic Columbia River Highway and in less than a half mile the Bridal Veil Falls parking area will be on your right.

This is our first time back to Bridal Veil falls since the Old Columbia River Highway reopened after the devastating Eagle Creek Fire.

Much like Latourell Falls, the Bridal Veil area wasn’t damaged by the fire. Although you can see how close it came to being burned by looking at Angel’s Rest and Sheppards Dell Falls.

From the parking area get on the trail and pass by the restrooms. The trail starts out paved and quickly turns to gravel a short distance later.

      

You’ll go down a long switchback that takes you to a set of stairs that ends at a bridge over the creek. Keep following the path to the right and up more stairs to a viewing platform above the waterfall.

      

Head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: .6 miles (easy)

Elevation: 100 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

 

Fernhill Wetlands (Winter)

Directions: Take 26 west to exit 57. Go left and drive for about 1.5 miles, take a right onto Zion Church Road. Drive for a little over 3.5 miles (Zion will become Cornelius Schefflin Rd.) and get onto Verboort Rd at the roundabout. In about a half mile you will come to a second roundabout, get on Martin Road here. Drive for 2 miles where you will come to highway 47, go left. Drive for about a mile and take a left onto Fernhill Road. Follow the signs for the parking area.

Fernhill Wetlands is a great place to view wildlife. The trails are all really easy to follow and go around two ponds/wetland areas off to the right (towards the road) and by another wetland area and a more heavily landscaped area.

      

      

We did a couple loops around the marsh area closest to Fernhill Road. Here we saw countless great blue herons, egrets, coots, marsh wrens, red-winged blackbirds, mallards, and nutria. I think this is the most herons we’ve seen in once place- it was crazy! We also saw a cormorant eat and LARGE fish!

      

      

Over on the other side we saw geese, tree swallows, bald eagles (plus a giant nest!), yellow-rumped warblers, pintails, and green-winged teals.

      

All of the trails are wide and very flat. We were running out of daylight or we would of stayed here for easily another hour or two. The overly groomed area closest to the parking lot was a little odd. Almost looked a little fake but other than that this place is great.

Distance: 2.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: None (easy)

Pet Friendly: Dogs are not allowed

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes on nice weekends

Warnings: None

Bridge Creek Falls (Winter)

Directions: Take Hwy 26 west and get onto Hwy 6 for Tillamook. Drive for about 32 miles where you will see the Footbridge Trailhead on your right.

This isn’t much of a hike but it’s a nice stop if you’re in the area or if you are hiking the Wilson River Trail. You’ll see Upper Bridge Creek Falls and head over a bridge that takes you across the Wilson River Narrows. You’ll end down at the river on a small beach with a view of the less spectacular Lower Bridge Creek Falls.

      

To see upper Bridge Creek Falls take the stairs at the parking area that lead you up to Highway 6 and head right towards a crash barrier. Carefully cross the highway and up the stone steps. From here you’ll go up a steep hill next to Bridge Creek and end at the base of the waterfall. This waterfall is fairly scenic for a little roadside guy. The very short trail is pretty steep and it can get kinda slick in the rain.

      

Head back and cross the highway again and walk between the crash barrier and a chain link fence that takes you to some steps down to a bridge that goes over the Wilson River Narrows. Cross the bridge and carefully head down the large rocks (no trail) that dumps you out at a small rocky beach area with a view of Lower Bridge Creek Falls across the river. The lower falls isn’t anything spectacular as it come shooting out of a large pipe that diverts the creek under the highway. You do get a nice view of the river and bridge up above. This spot becomes very popular during the summer months and you can see evidence of that in the beer cans and cigarette butts.

      

Overall these are nice stops if you need to get out and stretch on your way to the coast or if you are on the Wilson River Trail. We definitely wouldn’t make these our primary stop though!

Distance: .5 mile (easy)

Elevation: 100 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes in the summer

Warnings: Highway 6 can be very busy so please be extra cautious crossing it.

Wilson River Trail- Jones Creek Trailhead to Wilson Falls (Winter)

Directions: Take 26 west and get on Highway 6 towards Tillamook. Drive on Highway 6 for about 29 miles where you will turn right onto Jones Creek Rd. Cross over the bridge and take a left into the parking area.

Get on the trail near the trailhead marker and head down towards the Wilson River. Go right here and follow the many signs letting you know you are on the Wilson River Trail. You’ll soon pop up to a gravel road, keep following the signs and head back into the woods. About a half mile from the trailhead you’ll reach a bridge and can see the Tillamook Forest Center (open March-November). The bridge itself is interesting looking and gives you a great view of the river.

      

Back on the trail keep going as you wind through alder, maple, spruce and ferns. We actually saw a few early flowers lining the trail as well (and this was early February!). The trail comes out of the trees again to a road and a bridge over a creek that leads into the river. Cross this bridge and pick up the trail that again takes you back into the woods.

      

Next, the trail gains some elevation and switches back once as you head up to Wilson Falls. This is where we ended up turning around because we didn’t feel like getting our feet wet and having a soggy hike out. If you are here during a low water time you can keep going and will reach the Footbridge Trailhead in about a mile and a half. Head back out the way you came in.

      

The whole trail is well maintained and is mostly level until you reach the couple switchback that take you up to the waterfall.

Distance: 4 miles (easy)

Elevation: 350 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Salish Ponds (Winter)

Directions: Directions: Drive I-84 to the Fairview exit. Take a right at the signal and follow Fairview Parkway to Halsey Street. Take a left on Halsey and take a right onto Market Drive. Follow Market Drive to Village Street and take a right. Then take a left onto Park Lane where you will see Fairview City Park.

This trail is very easy to follow, is well maintained, and great for all ages. The whole trail is gravel and there are two ponds. You can go all the way around the main pond and part way around the smaller one.

      

This area has a decent amount of wildlife- you will see a lot of different birds (kingfishers, geese, mallards, coots, scrub jays, kinglets, etc.), nutria, and frogs.

      

There were a few people riding their bikes but it’s mainly other people walking and dogs.

      

The trail wraps around a Target store on a quiet trail and under an overpass. It continues on through a slightly marshy open area with large power poles before you reach the ponds. There isn’t anything too exciting with this trail, it’s best if you want a quick walk, have kids, or enjoy bird watching.

      

Distance: 2 miles (easy)

Elevation: Minimal (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes on nice weekends

Warnings: None

Summit Trail to Ski Bowl East- Snowshoe

Directions: Take highway 26 to Ski Bowl. Park as far east as you can in the parking lot.

Head down to the east end of the Ski Bowl parking lot where you will come to a road. You should see the Trailhead sign across the road. Get on the trail and depending on the snowpack you’ll have to cross a few small streams. The trail winds around back in the trees and you’ll cross 4 or 5 small footbridges in the beginning.

The trail rollercoasters pretty much the whole time but the elevation is nothing hard at all. This isn’t a super popular trail and we broke trail the whole way in, there was some old ski trails but they were days old. The trail is well marked and very easy to follow if you have to break trail.

We lucked out and there were a few storms that had rolled through in the days before so we got about 8 inches of new fluffy snow. The trail is pretty much the same the whole way, just a pretty, windy, treelined trail. You’ll soon start to see openings ahead and start hearing voices. That’s when you know you’re really close to Ski Bowl East. The trail dumps you out right at the ski lift.

From here head left on an access road making sure you stay very close to the edge. Snowmobiles use this road often and they come at you fast. The road takes you up to the tubing area with music blasting out of speakers. It’s pretty funny. The Summit Trail picks up just past this area. We only went a little farther due to time constraints. Head back out the way you came in.

95% of this hike is very quiet and we didn’t see a single person on the Summit Trail, but the very small section that goes through Ski Bowl is very loud and very crowded. Just be prepared for that.

Head back out the way you came in.

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: No

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: Sno-Park Pass required

Seasons: Nov-Apr

Popular: Only a small section

Warnings: None

Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge (Autumn)

The parking area at Oaks Bottom is notorious for break-in’s and we had a problem with a man basically telling us he was going to break into our car as soon as we left, we even saw the slim jim in his backpack 🙄. We wont be parking in this main parking lot ever again, it’s too bad because this behavior may make it to where people don’t visit Oaks Bottom. We hope you still visit and we would recommend parking at Oaks Bottom Park.

Directions: From the intersection of SE 17th and Powell, head south on 17th. Cross Holgate and McLoughlin, and head into Sellwood. Turn right on SE Bybee. Bybee turns into SE 13th, follow 13th. Turn right onto Sellwood which veers into SE 7th. You’ll see the parking area for Oaks Bottom Park.

From the parking area get on the trail that heads downhill. Once at the end of this hill go right and go to a split in the trail. This hike can be done as a loop, going left here will get you on the Springwater Trail first, going right has you entering the refuge first. Either way you choose loops around and ends back at this junction. Fair warning…on the weekend there is a large train that runs right along the Springwater Trail and it is VERY loud. Because we were here during the time the train runs we decided to make this an out-and-back hike. We went right at the junction and entered into the refuge. You’ll immediately be following along a marshy area where there are a lot of water birds. We saw mallards, pintails, coots, and geese.

      

The trail switches from packed dirt and rocks to boardwalk as you follow along. There is a viewing platform out to the marsh and Oaks Park, we saw a few great blue herons and an eagle here. As we continued hiking we saw a brown creeper, bushtits, crows, scrub jays, a hummingbird, and golden-crowned sparrows.

      

The trail is very easy to follow and you will pass by the Portland Memorial Mausoleum, it has large paintings on it. Eventually you’ll come to a junction, you can turn around here or continue left and visit the tadpole pond.

      

This is a great hike for wildlife viewing and would be great for kids as well. The trail is very easy and there is a lot to look at along the way.

Distance: 2.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 150 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes

Warnings: Break-ins at the main parking area.