Category Archives: Pet Friendly

Timothy Lake- West Side (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 about 40 miles past the town of Sandy to Skyline Road. Turn right onto Skyline Road and follow it for a little over 8 miles to a junction with FR 57. Turn right and drive for about 3.5 miles where you will cross over the dam. Turn right and a short distance later come to an intersection. Go right into the parking area.

We did this hike on a day with VERY thick wildfire smoke. We couldn’t see Mt. Hood at all which was a bummer but this was still a nice hike.

Head off on Timothy Lake Trail #528 that’s lined with trees, beargrass, and rhododendron bushes. You’re hiking right next to campsites nearly the whole time. We were here very early so most people were still sleeping so it was quiet. I’d imagine it could get pretty noisy and busy during peak camping season.

      

The trail is flat almost the whole time, it switches from being wide to a bit narrow. It’s mostly dirt and rock, it’s been dry so we kicked up a lot of dust while we were here. Our legs were pretty filthy 😆. You’ll be near the lake the whole time and there are many side trails that take you right to the edge of the lake. You’ll cross a couple footbridges and mostly just wind through a very pretty lakeside trail.

      

About 3 miles in you’ll come to where the lake narrows. The water color was a pretty green here and there are some places to stop and rest if needed. We decided this was a nice place to stop to make an out and back trip of 6 miles. If you go to the junction with the Pacific Crest Trail you will have a roughly 7 mile hike. So head back out the way you came in.

      

This isn’t the most exciting hike and you don’t get a super quiet nature feel with walking by about 12+ different campsites. Still, the lake and trail are very pretty. We’re definitely coming back but probably in fall when people aren’t camping much. Make sure to walk by the dam, it’s pretty interesting!

Distance: 6 miles (moderate)

Elevation: 60 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Spring through fall

Popular: Yes

Warnings: None

Cape Falcon (Summer)

Directions: Take Highway 26 west to Highway 101. Go south on Highway 101 for a little over 13 miles. There is a parking area on the right side of the highway for Oswald West State Park and Cape Falcon.

Take the trail for Cape Falcon (it’s toward the right side of the parking area), this trail is a mix of dirt, rocks, and a ton of roots. It can get VERY slippery with even just a little bit of rain, it started to sprinkle on our way out and one of us slipped on a rock and took a good fall. We saw a few other people sliding around as well. If you’re here during the rainy seasons plan for a trail with thick mud and pools of water.

The trail starts out gradually uphill as you quickly leave the highway noise behind. You’re walking through large spruce trees and it’s very pretty. In about a half mile you’ll come to a signed trail junction where you head right. You’ll start noticing the salal here and get ready because it gets much taller and thicker later in the hike. There are glimpses of the ocean as you wind through the trees and come to a boggy area with skunk cabbage and a short boardwalk section.

      

From here the trail rollercoasters but it’s nothing too steep. A few times you’ll drop down into some boggy areas and then back up and out to some views of the ocean. While we were here we saw a ton of surfers below. The trail is pretty eroded in areas so watch where you walk.

      

      

Keep following the trail as it winds its way along the edge of the cape and you start seeing Neahkahnie Mountain through the trees. After passing an especially eroded section that’s covered in roots from the salal you’ll keep going a bit farther to a very obvious but unsigned split in the trail. Go left as the trail cuts through the 6+ foot tall salal and heads uphill gradually. The trail opens up briefly at a viewpoint but keep going off to the right on a very narrow trail through shorter salal. This trail takes you to the tip of Cape Falcon and an open area with nice views of the ocean and Neahkahnie Mountain. The salal can be sharp where it’s been cut, it’s a good idea to hold your arms up above it or keep them very close to your sides.

This is an out and back trail so head back the way you came in.

      

We loved this hike! It was very pretty and kinda had that storybook type look. The views are great as well.

Distance: 5 miles (moderate)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: May not be best for older folks and young kids. The trail is pretty eroded and covered in roots that are easy to trip on.

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warning: Falling

Ponytail Falls (Summer)

This hike was done less than a week before the Eagle Creek fire. We don’t know how bad this trail has been damaged. Hopefully the damage was minimal and we’ll be able to see all three of the waterfalls on this hike again soon!

Directions: Take I-84 East to the Ainsworth State Park (exit 35) and follow the Old Highway left towards Horsetail Falls.

We decided to do this hike in the opposite direction that we went the last time we visited, which was a couple years ago. To see that post click here.

Park in the Horsetail Falls parking lot and take the trail just to the left of the waterfall. You’ll be heading up long switchbacks that take you up above Horsetail Falls. The trail levels out a bit as you round a corner and start hearing Ponytail Falls. The waterfall itself pours out of a crack in the basalt shelf and dumps into a small pool below. The trail takes you behind the waterfall and continues on the other side.

      

      

Not far after the waterfall you’ll pass a slide area and come to a side trail that takes you to a great view of the Columbia River and nice views of the Gorge to the east. Back on the main trail it continues to stay pretty level for a bit and then you hit a few more switchbacks as you head down into the Oneonta Gorge area. You’ll cross a bridge and get a nice view of Middle Oneonta Falls and the Gorge itself. If you’re here on a warm day you’ll probably hear the crowds of people at Lower Oneonta falls below.

      

After crossing the bridge the trail heads uphill to a trail junction. Go right here and the trail switches from being level to heading uphill, but nothing too steep. There is another small slide area and you’ll pass another side trail that takes you to a viewpoint. Soon the trail starts heading downhill as you make your way down to the old highway.

      

Go right on the should of the highway (be cautious, there isn’t a lot of room here) and pass Oneonta Gorge and go through the Oneonta tunnel, about a quarter of a mile later you’ll be back at Horsetail Falls.

 

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 650 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: This depends on how comfortable you are with hiking. There are a decent amount of switchbacks on this trail and places you could fall (there was a death on this trail last year). You’ll also be walking along the old highway for a short distance. Be cautious and make sure you’re surefooted and you should be fine.

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: Falling and walking along a narrow road.

Wallowa Lake- Kayak (Summer)

Directions: From the town of Joseph take Main St. south where the road curves and turns into Wallowa Lake Hwy. About 6 miles later you’ll enter the Wallowa Lake area follow the road off to the right and enter the parking area for the lake.

There is a dock on the south end of the lake where the marina is and that’s where we put our kayak in. You get the best views of the Wallowa Mountains on this end as well.

Wallowa Lake is pretty huge and you can see just how big it is while you’re driving on the Wallowa Lake Highway, you follow right along it for miles. We saw every type of boat and recreational water sport while we were there. Speed boats, pontoons, jet skis, kayaks, canoes stand up paddle boards, inflatable donuts…you name it, we probably saw it! It doesn’t necessarily feel crowded because the lake is so big, but you will always be within earshot of someone and the speed boats tend to rip around the lake so you’ll be bouncing around quite a bit.

      

While we were on the lake we saw a few bald eagles, osprey, and quite a few common mergansers. There were a few deer out in the grass as well. 

If you paddle about to the center of the lake there are some small square floating docks, some with benches, that you can get out and relax on.

The whole lake and surrounding area is quite scenic, we had a great time while we were out on the water.

Distance: Depends on how far/where you’re going. It’s an easy paddle.

Elevation: —

Pet Friendly: Sure if you’re dogs like being out on the water.

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area.

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site (Summer)

Directions: Drive I-84 east to La Grande, go north on Highway 82 and follow it into the town of Joseph. Once in Joseph follow Main St. through to the south end of town where the road curves and turns into 8th St. The Park is on the right.

We took a little trip out to Eastern Oregon and this was our first stop. We did an evening hike which was great for wildlife viewing.

From the small parking area head up the dirt path that has a few longer switchbacks and takes you to the top of a small hill. You get views down into a meadow and the Wallowa Mountains off in the distance. The trail soon heads back downhill and follows along the meadow and Silver Lake Ditch, we saw a few deer here which was great. There were many birds in the trees along the trail as well.

      

Soon you’ll come to a split in the trail, we went right towards Knight’s Pond that you can walk around. We also took the trail to the left of the pond and walked along a offshoot of the Wallowa River. Both the pond and the stream are very pretty, there are a couple small bridges over both.

      

From here we wondered around a little bit and then headed out the way we came in. This whole area is very scenic with the mountains, pond, and stream. Add in the deer and how quiet it was and we were very happy we decided to check this place out.

      

Make sure to stop and read some of the informational signs to learn about the history of this beautiful area!

We were here during some pretty intense wildfire smoke and can’t wait to come back when it’s clear out, to get even better views of the Wallowa Mountains. The smoke did make for a pretty great sunset though!

Distance: 2 miles (easy)

Elevation: 80 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Can be on nice weekends. Seems to be quiet on weekdays.

Warnings: People have seen bears in the area.

Swan Island Dahlia Festival (2017)

For directions click here.

It had been a couple years since we last visited the Dahlia Festival and not much has changed, it’s still a great flower display!

      

There are two large fields with rows of dahlias. Make sure you read the signs and don’t walk down the rows (like you can at the tulip festival). If you’re taking pictures you’ll have to do so of the flowers along the edges. There were a ton of different types of dahlias and they all have very interesting and sometimes funny names.

      

If you go during the festival weekends they have an indoor display, live music, food vendors, and demonstrations. It can get busy during festival weekends, we got there as soon as they opened and it wasn’t so bad. By the time we left it was getting packed though. There are no entrance or parking fees.

      

We highly recommend checking this place out, it’s our favorite flower display and a nice way to cap off the end of summer!

      

Owl Point (Summer)

Directions: Drive Highway 26 to the town of Zigzag and take a left onto Lolo Pass Road. Follow this road for about 10.5 miles, take the second right onto FS 18. Follow this road for about 10 miles, half of which is a gravel road, and take a very sharp righthand turn onto FS 16. Drive for 5.5 miles and turn right at the large intersection onto FS 1650. This road becomes gravel and ends at the Vista Ridge Trailhead.

This is a busy trailhead and it doesn’t have a huge parking area, so things may get tight. Many hikes start from the Vista Ridge Trailhead but the trail to Owl Point is not the most popular which is very nice. We only saw two other people the whole time we were here, and it was a very sunny weekend.

From the trailhead follow the rocky trail for about a third of a mile to a junction in the trail. Sign in at the wilderness registration station and then head left. The trail starts out fairly evenly graded but that quickly changes. The trail starts heading uphill and it gets pretty steep in some sections. The trail itself is nice but there are a few downed trees, they are all easy to get over. After about a mile of hiking you’ll come to two side trails off to the right. The first offers a great view of the valley below and the second gives you a really good view of Mt. Hood.

      

Back on the main trail it will soon level out and open up a bit. There are a lot of huckleberry bushes through here and we even ran into some snow piles (we did this hike in late July). You’ll drop down into a small meadow and start heading uphill again, it’s not quite as steep and isn’t as long. In mid to late July the Avalanche Lilies are blooming and it’s pretty amazing. They lined the trail and were all over the meadow.

      

When you come to a junction go left/uphill (there is a sign but it was quite faded). You will come to another junction, go right here and the trail ends at Owl Point. It offers up one of the best views of Mt. Hood. The lupine was blooming which just added to the spectacular view.  Wander around a little bit and you can see Laurance Lake off to the right over the large rocks and the town of Parkdale. There’s a small Owl Point Register attached to the rocks, it has pictures of the volunteers from Portland Hikers who cleaned up this trail and a guestbook you can sign.

 

      

There are plenty of places to sit and relax, have lunch and take in the view.

      

When you’re done at Owl Point there are couple more places to check out before you head back to your car. At the first junction after Owl Point go right and hike for about 200 yards to Alki Point. It’s a rockslide area with views of Mt. Adams, Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier.

      

Head back from Alki point and go through the junction that splits to Owl Point and head back down to the first junction. Go left here and towards the Rockpile. You’ll hike through a pretty meadow with blooming heather that attracts a lot of butterflies. There’s a small fork in the trail, go right and the trail ends at the Rockpile with even more views of Mt. Hood.

Head back to the main trail a follow it out the way you came in, to get back to your car.

We really loved this hike and can’t believe it’s not more popular. The views are amazing all through the hike and the wildflowers were a real treat as well.

 

Distance: 4.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 650 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: There’s a decent amount of elevation, with some steep sections so this may not be the best for older folks and younger kids.

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: Summer and fall (unless we’re having unusually dry or wet weather, call before going.)

Popular: No, but the trailhead/parking area is popular.

Warnings: None

Powell Butte (Summer)

Directions: This hike starts at the Visitor Center, just off of 162nd and Powell in Southeast Portland.

From the parking area at the Visitor Center (just past the piano that’s free for the public to play!) get on the paved Mountain View Trail. You’ll follow this a short distance until you come to a gravel section in the trail, go right here and get onto Pipeline Lane. You’ll backtrack a bit and get a nice view of Mt. Hood and Mt. St. Helens as you follow the thick gravel trail towards the north.

      

The trail gradually heads uphill and skirts along the tree line. Off to your left you can see the gated entrance to the underground reservoir. Soon you’ll come to an intersection in the trail, go right and get onto Holgate Lane where you enter the woods. Follow this dirt and rock trail through the woods at a fairly level grade. There is a giant metal pipe that lines most of this trail and does have leaky spots so year round there are muddy sections of the trail. Soon you’ll reach the Elderberry Stairs on your left, head up these somewhat steep steps that wind up the side of the hill.

      

Continue following the trail until you come to another junction. Go left here and get back on Pipeline Lane, you’ll follow this trail back out the way you came in with a view of Mt. Hood almost the whole way back.

      

Powell Butte is great for an after work hike or quick weekend outing. It does stay pretty busy year round no matter if it’s a weekday or weekend.

Make sure to pack your binoculars if you’re into wildlife viewing. There are lots of different birds, butterflies,and even deer.

 

Distance: 2 miles (easy)

Elevation: 180 (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Very

Warnings: There are nettles along the trail in the woodsy areas.

Fairy Falls (Summer)

Directions: Take I-84 East to exit 28. Go left on the Historic Highway to the Wahkeena Falls Trailhead.

Whenever we do this hike we’re always reminded just how pretty it is and thoroughly enjoy ourselves.

From the trailhead cross the small bridge over the creek and head up a long paved switchback that takes you to Wahkeena Falls. Even during the summer months this waterfall puts off a decent amount of spray so you may get a bit wet as you cross in front of it. The trail stays paved as you pass a bench and head for the cardio kicker section of this hike- 12 switchbacks. The switchbacks are fairly short and are paved for the most part.

      

      

Once you make it to the end of the switchbacks you will come to a trail junction. It’s worth the short trip to Lemmon’s Viewpoint off to the right. Once you’ve seen enough at the viewpoint head back to the junction and go left where you will start seeing the creek and the trail levels out briefly. The pavement also ends here and switches to dirt and rock. You will be following the creek just about the rest of the hike as you cross the first of two footbridges and the trail again starts heading uphill. All through this area is very beautiful with all the moss covered trees and the creek being so close to the trail. It’s one of our favorite sections of Gorge trails. After crossing the second footbridge you have a few more switchbacks and then you are at Fairy Falls. The waterfall is right on the trail and there is a bench to rest or enjoy lunch.

      

When you’re ready, head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: 2.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 800 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: There’s a good amount of elevation for the short distance so this hike may not be best for younger kids and older folks.

Bathrooms: Yes but they are seasonal

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes especially nice weekends

Warnings: None

Cape Kiwanda (Summer)

Directions: Head to Pacific City on the Oregon Coast and get onto Cape Kiwanda Drive. Follow it down to the public parking areas near the beach.

From the parking area head down towards the beach. Take a right and head for the large dune right in front of you. Go left on the dune where it’s less steep and hike up to the top. Once up at the top you will have great views of the beach below, Pacific City, and the Haystack out in the ocean. There is an interesting cave that makes quite the noise when large waves come crashing in. You can go farther up the dune to get even better views as well. There is a lot to explore up here so make sure you give yourself enough time to see everything!

      

      

There is a cable fence that runs along the top and while we were here there was a Ranger walking along the fence letting people know that it is allowed to cross the fence, but he was warning that it’s very dangerous near the edges. He flat out didn’t recommend going down towards the cave. Many people have fallen at Cape Kiwanda and there are a lot of clothespins clipped to the fence with memorials written on them for those who have died. The day before an 8 foot chunk had fallen into the ocean, the edges are very unstable. 

      

We did cross the fence at the large flat area, but didn’t go anywhere near the sides. We saw a lot of people standing right on the sides and down by the cave. We do NOT recommend doing this. Please listen to the Ranger and stay where it’s safe.

We saw plenty of seabirds, and a deer munching on some bushes on a ledge. Whales have been spotted during the summer months but we didn’t see any on our trip. We were surprised to see paintbrush, clover, and salal blooming, it was a nice treat!

      

Cape Kiwanda is a VERY popular place and definitely shows some signs of over loving. Please respect the area and pack out anything you brought with you.

 

Distance: .5 – 2 miles, depends how much exploring you do (easy)

Elevation: 240 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes year round

Warnings: Falling