Category Archives: Pet Friendly

Tamanawas Falls (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take Highway 26 past Government Camp to the junction with Highway 35. Follow 35 for about 15 miles. The trailhead is just past Sherwood Campground on the left shoulder of the highway.

From the parking area get on the trail and immediately come to a bridge crossing the Hood River. After crossing the bridge go right and follow the trail as it heads uphill for a while. You will come to a point where you can see the highway below, from here the trail heads downhill to another bridge.

     

     

The trail now follows along the creek- there are a few side trails along the way that take you to small waterfalls. Continuing on you will come to a large rock slide area. Please make sure you are following the actual trail and not cutting through, cutting the trail only makes things unstable and unsafe. After you are through the rock slide area it’s just a short distance to the waterfall. Head back out the way you came in.

     

     

Distance: 4 miles (easy)

Elevation: 600 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area

Parking Fee: NW Forest Pass required

Seasons: May-November

Popular: Very

Warnings: None

Mosier Plateau (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69 (Mosier). Follow the old highway into Mosier and parking in the gravel parking lot just past the totem pole on the left side of the road.

From the parking area cross the bridge and find the trail on the right side of the road near a bench. The trail starts uphill and takes you to an old pioneer cemetery. Continue on the trail where it stays mostly evenly graded and you will come to Mosier Creek Falls down in the canyon off to the right.

   

   

Continuing on you will go up a number of fairly long switchbacks and a few sets of steps. Along the switchbacks we saw bachelors button, poppy’s, balsamroot, and wild cucumber.

   

   

Once you get to the top you will have a great view of the Gorge and it’s covered in balsamroot and lupine. Head back out the way you came in.

   

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 600 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: There is an outhouse by the totem pole

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes during spring wildflower season

Warnings: Ticks, poison oak, and snakes

Memaloose Hills (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 to exit 69. Follow Highway 30 east and in 3 miles you will see the Memaloose Overlook sign with a gravel parking lot on the left.

This spring has been amazing for Gorge wildflowers the blooms are the best we’ve probably ever seen!

From the parking area carefully cross the road and pick up the trail. It heads gradually uphill passing by a few homes off to the right. You will start seeing wildflowers immediately but it gets better as you go. The trail eventually levels out for a while as you wind your way back towards the hills.

   

Soon you will head down a short hill and come to a small stream that’s easy to cross. Just a short distance later the trail forks, going left/straight takes you to Marsh Hill. This hill is the less steep of the two, you get a nice view of Mt. Hood and it’s covered in wildflowers. When you are done head back down to the split in the trail. Heading off the other way takes you to Chatfield Hill. You will walk through a grassy area filled with buttercups and a bunch of cows off to the left. Soon you will start to head uphill through oak trees and just a short distance later you will come out of the trees and see Chatfild Hill. It was COVERED in balsamroot and lupine when we were here- it was amazing.

   

   

Continue following the trail as it heads up Chatfiled Hill- it does get pretty steep in areas. Once at the top of the hill you will have great views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams and the Columbia River. It’s the best out of the two hills but they are both beautiful. Head back out the way you came in.

   

Some of the many flowers you will see are balsamroot, lupine, paintbrush, buttercups, wild cucumber, and chocolate lilies.

   

Distance: 3.5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 550 feet (moderate)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most- there are some steep sections heading up each hill.

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: During spring wildflower bloom

Warnings: Ticks, poison oak and snakes

Government Cove Peninsula- Kayak (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 East to the exit just past Cascade Locks that’s marked for a weigh station. Get on Frontage Rd and continue on and cross the tracks. Park near the gate.

We’ve always just hiked around this area but decided to kayak around the coves this time.

We put the kayak in just to the left of the gate off the large rocks that line the edge of the water. We paddled out and around and passed the sailboat that is anchored near the grass. There is a large eagles nest up in the trees here which was great to see.

   

The two coves don’t connect so you will have to go out into the Columbia briefly. So continue out towards the river and go left where you can get into the second cove. It was windy and the river was pretty choppy while we were here, it was a little rough getting into the second cove but definitely doable.

   

After exploring the second cove paddle back out the way you came in. If you hike to the top of the rock on Government Cove you can see the coves where you’ll be kayaking.

There were a lot of birds (so bring binoculars!) and good views of the Gorge. It was a unique kayak and we’ll definitely be back.

Distance: 1-2 miles (easy)

Paddle: Easy (the river may be a bit choppy)

Pet Friendly: Sure if they are good in a kayak 🙂

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Government Cove Peninsula (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 East to the exit just past Cascade Locks that’s marked for a weigh station. Get on Frontage Rd and continue on and cross the tracks. Park near the gate.

This is a nice quick hike with good views of the Gorge.

You can pretty much explore this area however you want. There is a paved path that takes you up to the top of the rock. You get nice views at the top and it would make a good place to eat lunch if you brought it.

   

There is also a trail that goes all the way around the base of the rock and takes you out to a point right along the Columbia.

   

We were here a bit too early for wildflowers but if you come late April through early June there will be a bunch of different types of flowers.

Distance: 2.25 miles (easy)

Elevation: 100 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Warnings: None

Tulip Festival (2019)

The Tulip Festival is located in Woodburn, Oregon and runs through April 29th this year.

We visited the fields just last Sunday and they were definitely in full bloom so now is a great time to go. We would recommend getting there right when it opens because it gets very busy very quickly. It’s also very muddy right now so rubber boots are a good idea.

   

   

The color was amazing and all of the flowers were beautiful as usual!

   

Check out their website for info on ticket prices, food/craft booths and everything else happening at the farm.

Deschutes River Trail (Spring 2019)

Directions: Take I-84 east to exit 97 and take a right, and then a left to get on Highway 206E. From here you will see signs for Deschutes River Park, it’s less than a mile away. Go all the way through the park to the very end where you will see the trailhead.

Walk through the grassy field where you will have two options, going left will take you to the top and middle trail (the top trail is for hikers and bikers, middle just hikers) and going right will take you to the lower trail. We chose to go right and take the lower trail that follows along the river.

   

The trail is maintained, easy to follow, and follows right next to the Deschutes River. There are many geese in this area so there is poop everywhere and you will be hearing geese the whole time. This area was burned in the Substation Fire July of 2018, there is a lot of burned ground, trees and shrubs. We could already see new growth which was encouraging!

   

Follow along the river and pass a pump house and a cable that crosses the river. There will be a split in the trail go left uphill to get on the middle trail. Staying on the lower trail will eventually take you to a rock slide area and you have to scramble around to keep up with the trail, we did this and don’t recommend it. Back on the middle trail you will be above the river now and get nice views of the surrounding hills. You will soon come to a big bend in the river as it hooks left and you can see the rock slide below and a natural arch formation. We hiked about another half mile down the trail from the arch where you get past the bend and the river straightens out again. We made this our turn around area, head back out the way you came in. The Deschutes River Trail is a little over 11 miles one way so you could definitely extend your hike if you have the time. Stopping where we did would give you a 5 mile hike.

   

Distance: 5 miles (easy)

Elevation: 300 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the trailhead and about 1-1.5 miles in on the trail

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: On nice weekends

Warnings: Ticks and snakes

Moulton Falls & Bridge (Winter 2019)

Directions: Drive I-5 North to Exit 11 (Battleground and 502E), merge right with 502E to Battleground. Drive 6 miles into Battleground and take a left at a traffic light signed for 503N, Amboy, Yacolt. Stay on 503N (Lewisville Highway) for 5.5 miles and take a right onto NE Rock Creek Road which eventually turns into Lucia Falls Road. Drive about 3 miles until you reach a stop sign (junction with 172nd), continue straight and follow the road until you see the Moulton Falls trailhead on the right.

From the parking area head off to your left along the road and cross over the creek. From here you will get on a wide trail and soon start to see the river off to your right. Look for a side trail that takes you out on some large rocks and gives you a good view of the bridge.

Back on the main trail head uphill to the bridge. After crossing the bridge the trail follows along the river. You can hike for about 4 miles before coming to another trailhead, we stopped after about a mile. We have hiked this whole trail and it’s not the most exciting, it’s wide and fairly evenly graded. You can see some houses across the river but that’s about it.

   

Before you leave go off to the right of the parking lot and get down to river level. This is the Moulton Falls area, it’s hard to see it in the winter with high water levels but this place gets packed with swimmers in the summer.

Distance: 2 miles (can do up to 7.5) (easy)

Elevation: 225 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes very popular in the summer

Warnings: None

Yacolt Falls (Winter 2019)

Directions: Drive I-5 North to Exit 11 (Battleground and 502E), merge right with 502E to Battleground. Drive 6 miles into Battleground and take a left at a traffic light signed for 503N, Amboy, Yacolt. Stay on 503N (Lewisville Highway) for 5.5 miles and take a right onto NE Rock Creek Road which eventually turns into Lucia Falls Road. Drive about 3 miles until you reach a stop sign (junction with 172nd), continue straight and follow the road until you see the Moulton Falls trailhead on the right.

Warning: Please pay attention to the entrance and exits at the trailhead. There are road spikes at the exits, it’s not very clearly marked and you could easily enter through the exit and shred your tires.

From the trailhead walk down the side of the road and cross it at the designated crosswalk. Pick up a trail here that heads next to a creek. Keep following this trail as you wind your way past some old picnic tables and up to a fenced area with views of Yacolt Falls. You can take the steps down to a rocky viewing area and a seasonal bridge.

The trail does continue on a short distance up to some train tracks. There is a tunnel off to the left a short distance but not much else. Head back out the way you came in.

   

Distance: .6 miles (easy)

Elevation: 50 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: None

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes during the summer

Warnings: This trail can get pretty soggy during the winter months. We had to rock hop a few sections to avoid wet feet.

Frog Lake- Snowshoe (Winter 2019)

Directions: Drive Highway 26 east past Government Camp, keep left at the junction with Hwy 35, staying on 26. Follow Hwy 26 for about another 5 miles where the Frog Lake Sno-Park will be on your left.

From the large parking area get onto the trail which is actually the road you would drive down to the lake on in the summer. Follow this wide path for .3 miles until you come to a signed junction (if it’s not covered in snow), go right here where it heads downhill.

   

The trail quickly levels out and you will follow this trail a short distance to a split, go left here and follow it around to the edge of the lake. It was frozen again with feet of snow on top of the ice. We walked out onto the lake and made a loop around it. When you are done exploring head back out the way you came in.

   

This area is very popular with snowmobiles so keep that in mind, they come up on you quick and are quite noisy and stinky. Even getting here early we still saw a few at the lake and quite a few heading in on our way out. This isn’t a snowshoe that offers much peace and quiet but it is still pretty. Always be cautious when walking on a frozen lake as well.

   

Distance: 3 miles (easy)

Elevation: 200 feet (easy)

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: Sno*Park Pass required

Seasons: Winter

Popular: Very

Warnings: Watch for snowmobiles and be careful when walking on the lake if it’s frozen.