Tumalo Falls (Winter)

Directions: From the city of Bend go west on Skyliners Road and follow it to Bearwallow Road where you will take a right. Less than a mile later take a left onto NF-4601 and follow this road for about 3 miles. Turn left and follow the road for about a mile and a half.

In the winter there is a small parking area at the snow gate that is just past a one lane bridge. With all the heavy snow the area got the parking lot had very deep snow. During the snowy months we would not recommend parking in the small lot if your car is not all wheel drive AND high clearance. We saw a few cars that were stuck and one that even had to be towed out of the area. Park along the road that forks left, right before the bridge.

From the snow gate get on the wide trail that in the peak seasons is the access road that takes you up to the waterfall. This is a heavily used trail so the snow was pretty packed down. We saw people snowshoeing, skiing, and just in boots. We started out snowshoeing and then decided to carry them since the snow was pretty hard.

      

      

You start out following pretty close next to Tumalo Creek. The trail rollercoasters for almost the whole 2.5 mile trip out to the waterfall and there are snowy ridges all around you. The trail mostly looks the same the whole way out but it’s quite pretty. At about the 2.25 mile mark you cross over a bridge and wind up a short hill where there are bathrooms and a viewing platform. There was so much snow that it was all the way up to the top of the railing around the viewing platform. You can take a steep but short side trail to get to a top viewing area but we were running out of daylight and didn’t have time. We will for sure head to the top on our next trip out here.

From here head back out the way you came in.

      

Distance: 5 miles

Elevation: 500 feet

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: Sno-Park Pass or a NW Forest Pass (depending on the season)

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes

Overall: Great winter hike or snowshoe. We’re excited to go back and see what it looks like without snow 🙂

Sandy River Delta (Winter)

Directions: Take I-84 East to exit 18 and take a right at the stop sign. Follow the road under the freeway to the parking area.

We started this hike on an unmarked trail that is near the entrance gate to the parking area. We followed this dirt and gravel trail straight and through an open area where there is an intersecting trail that you can take either left or right. We went right and followed this trail that’s up above the open meadow area you just walked through. The trail continues for a while before coming to an open area where you can see power lines and off to your right you can see the big open grass area that has a main trail running through it.

      

Head down to the main trail, where you get a nice view of Mt. Hood, and go left following it along a section of the Sandy River and to a bird blind. You can go past the blind a bit and get a view of the Columbia River. From here head back out and follow the main trail back through the open grassy area as it winds back around to the parking area.

      

The Sandy River Delta is the areas largest off-leash dog park, so you will see tons of dogs roaming around freely. You will also see mountain bikers and horseback riders, as well as hear duck hunters off in the distance. This area is great for birdwatching, we’ve seen many different birds here throughout the year.

There are many different intersecting trails and they aren’t really marked. Most of them lead back to main trails, it’s a great place to get out and just explore.

To see our previous post about the Sandy River Delta click here.

Distance: 3 miles

Elevation: Minimal

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Very

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes at the parking area.

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes

Overall: Very easy hike, more of a walk actually. Nice place to nature watch and just explore.

Best Of 2016

We did a lot of great hikes in 2016, here are some of our favorites and our overall top hike of the year.

  • Willamette Valley:

Henline Falls– This is a short hike but it takes you to an amazing waterfall. Catch it at the right time of day and you might just see a rainbow at the base as well!

  • Columbia River Gorge:

Columbia Hills State Park– Great area to see wildflowers with amazing views of the Gorge.

  • Washington:

Lewis River Falls– So many pretty waterfalls in such a short distance. Definitely a must see.

  • Coast:

The Thumb– This was probably the most unique hike we did this year.

  • Central Oregon:

Smith Rock (Misery Ridge)– The views are amazing at the top and you get a very up close view of Monkey Face!

  • Mt. Hood:

Wind Lake– You get to ride a chairlift up to the top of Ski Bowl and then hike to a somewhat hidden lake. And the whole time you have great views of Mt. Hood and Government Camp. 

  • Portland:

Powell Butte- This is a great hike in the city. On a clear day you can see Mt. Hood, Mt. St Helens, and Mt. Hood.

  • Southern Oregon:

Plaikni Falls– This hike was inside Crater Lake National Park, it’s very pretty, especially in autumn with all the beautiful colors.

  • Kayak:

Disappearing Lake– This was such a treat! It’s a lake that’s only around for about a month out of the whole year.

Overall Best of 2016:

Bald Mountain– The hike up bald mountain is beautiful and lined with beargrass. Once at the top you round a corner and come to one of the best views of Mt. Hood we’ve ever seen. Do this hike!

What were some of your favorite hikes in 2016? Any you’re looking forward to doing in 2017?

 

Frozen Gorge (2017)

Oregon has been experiencing one of its coldest winters in quite some time. We’ve had multiple ice and snow events making for some very pretty scenes across the state. Every time we have an extended period of freezing weather we like to get out and see what the Columbia River Gorge is looking like. To see our previous Frozen Gorge post click here and here.

Our first stop was Multnomah Falls. There were more people than we thought would be here since the roads were still a mess. It was probably the most frozen we’ve personally ever seen this waterfall.

      

Next up was Oneonta Gorge. The stairs that take you down into the gorge were a solid sheet of ice, we would definitely recommend wearing some sort of traction for your shoes.  The icicles lining the gorge were huge! The water was mostly frozen over but we stopped at the log jam, falling in the water would have been a very dangerous situation!

      

Our last stop was Horsetail Falls. There was so much ice that it was blue in places, the ice formations were so interesting! Again, everything was slick but it was well worth the effort!

      

The drive out was beautiful as well!

Hope everyone has been enjoying all this gorgeous winter weather! We’d love to hear about what you’ve been seeing/doing 🙂

White River West (Snowshoe)

Directions: Take Highway 26 past Government Camp and get onto Highway 35. Follow 35 for about 4 mile or so until you reach the White River West Sno-Park on your left.

We would recommend not parking along the edge of the parking area near the trail going up the snowbank. Many people were choosing to sled down the hill here and were not very careful around the cars at all.

From the parking lot there is a well worn path that leads up the snowbank and onto the main path. The first half mile of this snowshoe is on a very hard packed snow path, this is from all the people who sled in this area. We got up here pretty early and there was already about 10 cars in the parking area and they were all sledding. Once you get past this area it gets a lot better, it turns into snowshoe and cross-country ski trails. You follow along the river the whole time. it’s mostly snow covered but you will see parts of it at all times. You also get an amazing view of Mt. Hood right in front of you the whole way.

      

Basically you follow along the river out in the open with trees lining your path. After about a mile you will go under some power lines and head uphill into the trees. It’s not heavily wooded so you will still see the mountain peeking through. Once we got almost to the top of this hill we decided to go down the side of it to get back down to river level. We followed the river a bit longer and decided to call it a day. We went a little over a mile and a half in making for a nice 3+ mile snowshoe. You can definitely go farther and I know we will be back soon to explore this area more.

      

      

On your way back to the parking area we would recommend that you stay down near the river once you get back to where all the sledders are. They come flying down the hills and don’t pay much attention to who’s around. Plus it’s much easier to walk in the nice snow instead of the hard packed stuff from the sleds.

Distance: 3 miles (you can go farther if you want)

Elevation: 500 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: A Sno-Park pass is required.

Seasons: Anytime there is enough snow.

Popular: Very

Overall: The areas with all the sledding are a bit frustrating but it’s worth it once you get past all the crowds. The views of the mountain are amazing.

Little Zigzag Falls (Snowshoe)

Directions: Head east on Highway 26 until you reach Kiwanis Camp Road/Road 39 (about 6 miles past the town of Zigzag). Head north on this road until you reach the Kiwanis Camp (where they stop plowing the road). Park along the side of the road.

They usually only plow Road 39 to the Kiwanis Camp, it does occasionally get plowed to the Little Zigzag Falls Trailhead but I wouldn’t count on it. So the start of the hike depends on what type of plowing you encounter that day.

      

      

From your car start snowshoeing up the road until you come to the Little Zigzag Falls Trailhead. From here you can get on the main trail, it follows along the creek. Soon you will come to an area with large icicles hanging from it. It’s easily passable just watch your head. The creek has a lot of downed trees over it, when they are covered in snow and ice it looks quite pretty.

      

Continuing on you will cross a bridge and come to an open area which leads you right up to Little Zigzag Falls. The waterfall looked amazing with all the snow and ice!

      

Head back out the way you came in.

Distance: 1.5 miles from the Kiwanis Camp, .6 if you started at the trailhead.

Elevation: 40 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: When there is enough snow for snowshoeing.

Popular: No

Overall: Very lovely snowshoe, we highly recommend it!

Bridal Veil Falls (Winter)

Directions: Take I-84 East to Bridal Veil exit #28. Take a right onto the Historic Columbia River Highway and in less than a half mile the Bridal Veil Falls parking area will be on your right.

From the parking area get on the paved trail that heads past the bathrooms and curves right. The trail quickly turns to dirt and heads down one long switchback. We did this hike a few days after the recent ice storm so the trail was pretty much a sheet of ice. We would not recommend hiking this trail if it’s icy unless you have some sort of shoe traction (YakTrax, Stabilicers, IceTrekkers, etc). Even with these on our shoes we still fell a few times.

      

After the switchback you will head down a staircase and follow a bridge over Bridal Veil Creek. From here you can go up more stairs to a viewing platform where you get a nice view of the waterfall. You can also go down to creek level and get a side view of the falls and explore around the creek. When it’s not icy you can climb around the large rocks and get up nice and close to the waterfall.

      

This waterfall is always pretty but it was extra beautiful with all the icicles and snow surrounding it.

Head back out the way you came in.

Distance: .6 miles

Elevation: 100 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages. Unless it’s icy, then make sure you are sure footed and have the right gear with you.

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: None

Seasons: All

Popular: Yes on nice weekends.

Overall: We love going to the Gorge when we get snow or ice, the waterfalls look even better!

Enid Lake (Snowshoe)

Directions: Take Highway 26 to Government Camp Loop Road. Drive up the road a little over a quarter mile until you see the Thunderhead Trailhead on your left.

From the trailhead you start on Skiway Trail and soon fork left onto Maggie’s Trail. Stay on Maggie’s Trail and pass Lucy’s Trail. Next you will come to the Crosstown Trail, go left staying on the Crosstown Trail. Most of this area you will be heading downhill through lovely snow covered trees. We noticed a lot of rabbit tracks through here which was great.

      

Continuing on you will cross a small bridge and come to a sign that says Enid Lake. It’s pointing right, do NOT go right, go left and follow this trail a short distance where there will be a side trail off to your right. This short trail takes you right out to snow covered Enid Lake, on a clear day you’ll be able to see Mt. Hood peeking out behind the trees.

      

You can follow a trail around the small lake and head back out the way you came in.

      

This whole area has a fair amount of cross-country skiers and they can come flying around corners pretty quickly. Just be aware of that while you’re out on the trails.

Distance: 2.5 miles

Elevation: 200 feet

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: All ages

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: $6 snow-park permit

Seasons: Late fall through winter

Popular: Yes

Overall: This is a very pretty snowshoe. There are a lot of intersecting trails which can be confusing if you don’t have a map.

Trillium Lake (Snowshoe)

Directions: Drive Highway 26 past Government Camp, a few miles later you will see signs for Trillium Lake. Take the marked exit where you will see the large Sno-Park.

From the parking area head past the snow gate and start heading downhill. You will be snowshoeing for 2 miles down the access road that takes you to Trillium Lake. This part of the snowshoe is pretty much a roller coaster, you will lose and gain elevation a few times. The path is pretty well worn with snowshoe and cross country skiing tracks. It’s mainly just a nice snowy treelined path that takes you to the lake. You will see signs along the way keep following them down the road and past the campground entrance. Take the next right after the campground which will take you down to the lake.

      

It’s two miles from the parking area to the lake so if that’s enough (four miles round trip) you can hangout at the lake and head back the way you came. If you want to go farther head around the lake clockwise and go back out the way you came in, for a total of 6 miles.

It was pretty cloudy and sleeting most of the time we were here so we didn’t get the nice view of the mountain. It was still a great snowshoe though. This place starts getting pretty busy around 11am, getting here early would probably be best. The last hill on the way out is a big one as well, lots of people were struggling. Keep that in mind when you decide between the 4 and 6 mile options.

Distance: 4 or 6 miles

Elevation: We don’t know the exact elevation. There are definitely a few decent hills on the road heading in. Not much elevation at all going around the lake.

Difficulty: Moderate

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most ages- may not be best for young kids or older folks.

Bathrooms: Yes

Parking Fee: Sno-Park permit

Seasons: Anytime there is enough snow 🙂

Popular: Very

Overall: Great snowshoe area, even better if you hit a day without clouds!

Tooth Rock (Autumn)

Directions: Drive I-84 east to exit 40. Take a right at the stop sign and then an immediate left. Follow this road uphill where it ends at the Tooth Rock Trailhead.

The trail starts out paved as you pass by a Bonneville Power substation and soon come to a side trail to your right. This trail has a small brown marker that says Tanner Butte, take this narrow dirt trail and follow it uphill. There are a lot of downed trees on the first part of this trail, they are all easy to go under or around. You will also pass by an old refrigerator that has been dumped on the trail.

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Continue up the trail until you reach a sort of summit where there is a trail junction. Keep on the same trail as you start to head downhill somewhat steeply. This trail will end in two switchbacks that drop you off at the paved trail you started on just farther down.

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Go left on the paved trail where you will hear a lot of traffic from I-84 just below you. The path heads uphill a bit for a short distance before leveling out. You will pass a couple good spots that have a nice view of the Gorge and Bonneville Dam. From here you are just following the paved path back to your car.

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Distance: 2 miles

Elevation: 240

Difficulty: Easy

Pet Friendly: Yes

Good For: Most ages- there are some steep parts but it’s not very long.

Bathrooms: No

Parking Fee: $5 NW Forest Pass

Seasons: All

Popular: No

Overall: Not the most exciting hike but it’s nice if you don’t want to do a long hike.